San Elijo Hills Real Estate Market Update-April 2021

The average home selling in San Elijo Hills is selling for 109% of the listing price in an average of just 17 days. The price per square foot has jumped from $336 per square foot in 2020 to up to $466 in March of 2021. Currently, only four active homes for sale in San Elijo Hills and 16 homes are pending in escrow. With only 12 homes selling in March. Low mortgage rates and historically low inventory of homes for sale make now the time to sell your San Elio Hills Home. Please call or text 760 496-8134 and we can talk about safely selling your home.

760-496-8134 (Call/Text)
www.hillsandcoast.com
E: ed@hillsandcoast.com

Edward Philbrick: REALTOR Lic #01967137

Corcoran Global Living Lic #02109201  

A car ran a San Elijo Hill’s red light, pushing another car into a hydrant Tuesday Evening

Tips for a Calmer Feline Veterinary Visit

Experts recommend that all adult pets see a veterinarian once a year for a wellness visit.  These exams allow the veterinary team to screen for medical, husbandry, and behavioral concerns on a regular basis.  This gives owners tools to help their pet live as long and as happy a life as possible, while potentially identifying early signs of illness and disease allowing for early intervention.  Unfortunately, studies have shown that many cats are not getting these visits on a regular basis. This is not because cat owners do not love their feline family members, but because they are concerned about the emotional well-being of their pets.  

Many feline owners report that their cats feel an extreme level of stress when going to the vet, which may manifest as hiding, cowering, howling, and even aggression.  As a result, many cat owners avoid veterinary visits, sometimes until their pet is very sick.

There are, however, ways to make a cat’s veterinary visit a much lower-stress experience. Working in concert with your pet’s veterinarian and staff, techniques can be employed to lower your cat’s anxiety level before, during, and after the veterinary visit.  These calming techniques begin at home, days before your scheduled appointment.

Start with the Carrier:
The choice of carrier/crate is extremely important.  You may choose a hard or soft carrier depending on your and your cat’s preference, but whichever you choose, it should have a few traits:

  • It should be big enough for your cat to lie down in while still being light enough for you to carry from the bottom
  • The carrier should have at least two openings – one at the front and one on the top
  • It should be easy to take apart so that the cat doesn’t have to be dragged out of the carrier for the exam
  • It should be sturdy, secure, and quiet

Most cats flee at the sight of the carrier because they only see it when they are being taken to the vet.  This does not need to be the case.  You can train your cat to love its carrier!  First off, do not “hide” the carrier; this will only signal your cat to flee and become stressed when you remove the crate from its hiding place.  Leave the carrier out at all times and fill it with soft bedding.  Place it in an area that the cat likes to rest and leave the door open, encouraging your cat to use it as a sanctuary.  Many cats prefer elevated surfaces, so place the carrier on a secure table or shelf off of the floor.  Play with your cat near the carrier, so it becomes part of an enjoyable environment.  You may also place favorite toys, treats, or feline calming pheromone spray (“Feliway”) to encourage your cat to go into its carrier.  If your cat is reluctant at first, take the top off or the carrier leaving only the bottom tray and the soft bedding.  Once your cat starts to use the carrier for sleep, you can put the top back on and continue to encourage your cat to use the carrier as a safe space.

Calmer Transportation:

When it comes time to take your cat to the vet, give yourself time to make it a calmer experience.  Don’t rush to shove your cat into the carrier and go.  Take the time to lure your cat into the carrier with treats or toys.  Place familiar smelling objects in the crate before transport.

Once your cat is in the carrier, cover the carrier with a familiar smelling towel and/or one infused with calming pheromone spray.  When moving the crate, carry it from the bottom, at chest height, to prevent too much movement/swinging.  

In the car, place the carrier somewhere with lower visual stimuli and little motion.  The ideal place is on the floor behind the passenger seat.  Keep the towel over the carrier on three sides so the cat has the option to look out of the carrier or hunker in a darker space.  Play quiet, calming music while driving as cats may become stimulated by loud noises, and drive calmly trying to avoid sudden starts and stops.

At the Vet*:

Working with the veterinary team, you can make your cat’s time at the veterinary clinic a calmer experience.  Leave your cat in the safe space in the car for as long as possible.  This may mean calling the reception for check in or walking to the reception desk to check in while leaving your cat in the car, weather permitting.  Once in the hospital, keep your cat’s carrier on an elevated surface facing away from the open space of the waiting room where other animals may over-stimulate your pet.  

Once in the exam room, remain quiet and calm.  Open your cat’s carrier, but do not force them to exit.  Offer tasty treats and play with toys if your cat is interested.

*If your veterinarian is currently offering curbside service, leave your cat comfortably in their secure spot in the car until the veterinary staff member comes to get them for the exam.


The Return Home

Remember that your cat may still be in a heightened state of arousal when they come home.  This may interfere with their interactions with other pets in the household.  When you come home, take the carrier to a quiet, safe space and allow your pet to leave the carrier on its own. Watch for signs of stress or aggression between pets due to behavioral changes or foreign smells on your cat.  Distract other pets with treats or play while your cat acclimates to being back home.

Other Tips and Tricks

  • Bring your cat’s favorite high-value treats along to the veterinary visit.  Encourage staff members to feed your cat if your pet is willing to eat
  • Feed your cat less that morning so they arrive to the appointment hungry and willing to take treats
  • Purchase calming pheromone spray (“Feliway”) and spray covers, blankets, your car, and yourself 15 minutes before leaving for the vet

For very stressed cats, anti-anxiety medication can make veterinary trips a much calmer experience.  Appropriate use of these medications can help your pet immensely, resulting in less fearful visits which will ultimately benefit your pet’s health by decreasing stress and allowing for more comprehensive examinations.  Talk to your veterinarian about options for your specific pet.

If your cat has significant fear issues when going to the vet, discuss these concerns with your veterinarian so that their team can devise a plan to make the visit as low-stress as possible.  This will help your pet get the wellness care it needs to help it live as long and happy a life as possible.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our hospital at (760) 736-3636.

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

CSUSM SUMMER SESSION 2021 OFFERS 180 ONLINE COURSES AND POPULAR PAYMENT PLAN

The upcoming summer session at California State University San Marcos offers more than 180 online courses to CSUSM students as well as students from other universities and individuals in the community. In addition, a popular summer payment plan is being offered again, allowing students to pay for courses in three installments if they desire. Summer session dates are June 7 – Aug. 14, 2021.

“We are committed to supporting the success of our students as well as others in the community who are pursuing educational goals,” says Godfrey Gibbison, dean of Extended Learning and Global Programs. “Our faculty and staff have worked hard throughout the COVID-19 health emergency to offer solutions that anticipate and address students’ needs. With its wide range of courses, Summer Session 2021 sets students up to stay on track—or even get ahead— in their education plan.”

The Summer 2021 schedule includes courses from mathematics to computer science and from sociology to digital and media arts. The classes are offered on a compressed timeline with students earning units in as little as five weeks. All courses are taught by CSUSM faculty and are online as the university continues remote instruction in response to COVID-19.

During summer session, students from other universities, qualified high school seniors and community members can register for courses without being formally admitted to the university. Credits from CSUSM courses are fully transferable to other institutions. In addition, up to 24 undergraduate and nine graduate units taken as a nonmatriculated student may be counted toward a CSUSM degree.

The first block of classes will be held June 7 – July 10 and the second block of classes is scheduled for July 12 – Aug. 14. A small selection of classes runs the full 10-week summer session, June 7 – Aug. 14.

About Extended Learning at CSUSM

As the academic outreach arm of Cal State San Marcos, Extended Learning is a premier resource of professional and continuing education in North San Diego and Southwest Riverside counties. Our education experience is tailored to the unique needs of our students and includes undergraduate and graduate degree programs, global education, professional certificates, customized training for businesses, online courses and lifelong learning programs. Please visit CSUSM Extended Learning to learn more.

About California State University San Marcos

Building on an innovative 31-year history, California State University San Marcos is a forward- focused institution, dedicated to preparing future leaders, building great communities and solving critical issues. Located on a 306-acre hillside overlooking the city of San Marcos, CSUSM is the only public four-year comprehensive university serving North San Diego, Southwest Riverside and South Orange counties.

Summer Camp 2021 – Can We Go?

With rates of COVID-19 trending down in California, and schools opening back up for in-person instruction, will our kids be able to enroll in summer camps this year? Dr. Jaime Friedman’s latest blog gives a positive outlook for our kids getting out there and being social again. Take a look at it HERE

Children’s Physicians Medical Group (CPMG), in partnership with Rady Children’s Health Network, is dedicated to offering outstanding healthcare for your kids, from birth through age 18. Have you checked out our website?  We can help you find a doctor, explain why CPMG is right for you and allow you to view videos on our doctors and other health topics.

We’re also very social! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Ask us a question, leave us a comment or make a suggestion for future posts. We love hearing from you!

Sheriff’s Q&A on Community Crime @ the March 16th Board Meeting

The Board of Directors, upon hearing of the stabbing at the lower softball field, directed Walters Management to reach out to the SDSO and request extra patrols in the area.

The SDSO agreed to conduct extra patrols for a period of 30 days and will do so on each shift. Additionally, we have invited them to join our March board meeting to talk with residents about their concerns.

In the meantime, please stay vigilant and report all suspicious activity to the SDSO so that they can accurately collect data and respond by increasing patrols in areas as needed. 

Please use the form at this link https://sanelijohills.nabrnetwork.com/site/3902/dynform.php?qid=30714 to submit questions to be discussed at the March 16th meeting.

All questions must be submitted by 4pm Friday, March 12th. 

What to do when a snake bites you on a trail?


It’s snake season in San Elijo Hills -Here is some good advice for snake bites 

• No first aid is much better than performing bad first aid. Don’t cut at or around the site of the bite, don’t compress the bitten limb with a cord or tight bandage, don’t attempting to extract or neutralize venom using electricity, fire, permanganate, salt, black stones, mouths, mud, leaves, etc.

• All Snake Bite Kits are dangerous and should not be used. This was also confirmed by the Snake Bite Poison Line.

• A lot of snake bite patients injure themselves by panicking directly after a snake bite, by tripping over a rock or tree trunk, or by falling off the side of the trail. Staying calm is important! After a snake bite, walk about 20-30 feet away from the snake.

• Find a safe place to sit down asap. The venom can rapidly diffuse into your system, this can drop your blood pressure too low to pump all the way to your head while standing. Sitting down reduces your chance of fainting within the first few minutes. If you faint, it shouldn’t be more than a few minutes.

• Remove any rings, watches, tight clothing and anything else from the bitten limb, because the swelling will make it a lot bigger soon.

• Take 5 minutes to calm down and plan your evacuation. The only effective treatment for a snake envenomation is the right anti-venom to neutralize it.

• Do not wait for symptoms to appear if bitten. It’s important to get in touch with emergency personnel as soon as possible to get you to a hospital. If you have a cell phone and service, great, call 911 or the Park Ranger. If there is no service, think about the last time you had phone service.

• A sharpie can be a great help for emergency personnel to assess the severity of your snakebite. Circle the location of your snake bite and write down the time next to it. Draw a circle around the border of the swelling and write down the time. Write down all the things you’re experiencing that are not normal, with the time next to it. Examples are: metallic taste in your mouth, changes to sense of smell, sudden loss of vision, double vision, visual disturbances, ringing in the ears, headache, nausea and vomiting, bleeding from anywhere, dizziness, shortness of breath, etc. The most common signs and symptoms are pain and swelling.

• Update this info every 15 or 30 minutes as the swelling moves up the limb and your symptoms develop.

• Make contact via cell phone. If this is not possible, walk slowly to get help. Drink some water and take some calories if you have any. Some snake bite victims walk several miles after serious snake bites to their legs. They make it out fine because they made it out to medical care. This is much better than waiting for help if you can’t reach anyone. Don’t let the fear of “raising your heart rate and increasing the speed of venom circulation” prevent you from moving to get to care. Be very cautious about driving yourself to a hospital, since some bites have serious side effects that could suddenly limit your ability to drive.

Preventing a snake bite is obviously better than dealing with a snake bite. Here are a few ways to reduce the risks of snake bites while trail running:

• Be aware that there could be snakes where you’re running.

• Watch where you’re placing your feet, be extra aware on rocky, sunny areas, pockets of leaves and logs across the trail. If you’re off trail, the odds go up because there are more rocks and cracks and less people to scare the snakes away. Watch out when running through tall grass and weeds.

• Step on a rock or log, not over it. This way you can spot a snake that may be sheltering under it and take action quickly.

• Watch out when sitting down on a rock or tree stump, you might be sitting on a snake.

• Don’t try to chase the snake off the trail, this is why most people get bit by snakes.

• Don’t run with headphones on trails, or have at least 1 earbud out.

• Snakes tend to be near water, especially if it’s in a dry environment. If you’re near a spring or river, keep an extra eye out.

• Since snakes are cold-blooded, they’d like to come out when it’s warm and sun themselves on rocky areas or trails. They like to be on the edge of a sunny patch. If you come across a sunny patch, your encounter chances increase.

• Most venomous snakes in the US rest during the day. The chances of running into one are higher in the mornings and early evenings, when their activity might be a bit higher.

• In the spring, after snakes have hibernated together, the frequency of sightings goes up. In the fall, when they retreat to a hiding place to spend the cold winter months, they are on the go, so higher chances to encounter a snake. Most snake bites occur between April and October.

READ MORE VIA Source: What to do when a snake bites you on a remote trail? |

Organics recycling kicks off March 1 in San Marcos

Beginning March 1, it’ll be easier than ever to recycle leftovers and organic waste along with yard waste in San Marcos.

EDCO Disposal’s new Organic Waste Recycling Program will collect food scraps and yard debris mixed together in your green cart on your regularly scheduled trash and recycling pick-up day. Organic waste includes: food scraps, landscaping and pruning, non-hazardous wood cuttings and food-soiled paper waste. If it grows, it can now be recycled in your green cart!

Mandatory recycling of organic waste is the next step to achieving California’s Zero Waste goals. EDCO is now utilizing a state-of-the-art Anaerobic Digester at its Escondido facility which breaks down organic material collected from San Marcos and other service cities into renewable natural gas to fuel vehicles and fertilizer for farms. Anaerobic Digestion is an efficient and environmentally sustainable technology that can make a significant contribution to the management of organic waste in California. Capturing and reducing the amount of methane released into the atmosphere is critical in ensuring a safe and healthy environment.

The new facility will help local cities meet a statewide target of diverting 75% of organic waste from landfills by Jan. 1, 2025, as set by state law. Organic waste including food scraps and yard cuttings make up nearly half of the trash dumped into California’s landfills each year. Organic material cannot break down when it is buried in a landfill as it would in nature or in a compost pile. That’s because it decomposes without oxygen, and in turn releases harmful methane gas into the atmosphere.

ORGANICS RECYCLING SPECIFICS:

San Marcos’ residential trash service, EDCO will begin picking up organics recycling March 1 on your regularly scheduled trash collection day.  Learn more below on how to request a kitchen caddie and easily capture food scraps in the kitchen before transferring to your green waste cart.

RESOURCES: 

San Marcos Fire Department selected to participate in National Fire Protection Association’s Community Risk Reduction Pilot Program

The San Marcos Fire Department has been chosen by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to participate in the second phase of a pilot program to build a digital community risk assessment (CRA) tool. Aligned to NFPA 1300, Standard on Community Risk Assessment and Community Risk Reduction Plan Development, the tool, or “dashboard,” enables community leaders to gain valuable insights and make data-informed decisions surrounding fire prevention and other risk-reduction activities in their communities. 

According to NFPA, the concept of community risk reduction (CRR) – a process that identifies and prioritizes risks and ensures impactful mitigation initiatives – has been gaining traction across North America for more than 20 years. Innovative technology, access to data, and a shifting focus on prevention have resulted in new energy around this process. Reflecting that momentum, NFPA’s CRA tool works to help fire departments aggregate and disseminate data that pinpoint where risks exist within a given community.

“Access to accurate data will allow CRR leaders to use insights and make informed decisions about where to focus efforts and resources,” said Karen Berard-Reed, community risk reduction strategist at NFPA. “While many fire departments have struggled to work with data sets, NFPA’s CRA tool will do the complex work behind the scenes to compile relevant data allowing stakeholders to create effective community risk reduction plans that incorporate five priorities: Education, engineering, enforcement, economic incentives, and emergency response – in the most impactful ways possible.”

The first phase of the pilot project, which included participation from 50 fire departments across the country, helped identify features of the digital dashboard that will work effectively and those that need fine-tuning. During the second phase of the program, which involves participation from 250 departments nationwide, the San Marcos Fire Department will provide insights around the use of the dashboard through June of 2021 to help continue refining and enhancing its effectiveness.

“Participation in this project allows each fire department to provide important feedback that will be used to improve future versions of the dashboard, positions the community among CRR leaders in the United States, and signals an interest in leveraging technology to drive high-quality community safety initiatives,” said Berard-Reed.

As a participant in the pilot program, the San Marcos Fire Department will have free access to the dashboard, which includes customized visualizations (maps, charts, graphs) that illustrate each community’s risks and hazards across a variety of categories such as demographics, geography, building stock, economics, infrastructure, and event loss history. The dashboard also provides a snapshot of local capacity for risk reduction activities with information about public safety response agencies and community service organizations. In addition to dashboard access, participants will be provided rich networking and professional development opportunities with other communities engaged in CRR.

“We are thrilled to be participating in this important project,” said Dan Barron, Fire Chief of the San Marcos Fire Department. “Access to the tool will not only give us invaluable information about our community’s needs, but it’s rewarding to know that using the tool will increase its effectiveness and help other fire departments in the long run.” Follow NFPA’s CRR efforts on social media using #itstartswithinsights, or for more information online, visit www.nfpa.org/crr.

Assault with a Deadly Weapon – San Marcos | News Release | San Diego County Sheriff

Assault with a Deadly Weapon – San Marcos Deputies need information of a 17-year-old who was stabbedPost Date:02/21/2021 2:41 AMA 17-year-old male who had been stabbed was located in the Sports Park at 1105 Elfin Forest Road in the San Elijo Community, San Marcos.It happened on Saturday, February 20th, around 8:00 p.m.. The San Marcos Station patrol deputies responded to a radio call of a 17-year-old male who sustained a stab wound.  When deputies arrived, they located the injured juvenile.  The San Marcos Fire Department evaluated the injured victim and coordinated his transport to Children’s Hospital via

.  The victim provided limited information as to what occurred and who was involved.  Deputies were unable to locate a crime scene at the park and the suspect is still outstanding.  The victim is currently in stable condition, receiving medical care. Anyone with information can call the Crime Stoppers anonymous tip line at (888) 580-8477.

Source: Assault with a Deadly Weapon – San Marcos | News Release | San Diego County Sheriff

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