Search Results for: mountain lion

Mountain lion sighting today in San Elijo Hills

A mountain lion was reported on Doublepeak trail around 2:30pm this afternoon, near the Symphony/Montage vacant development in San Elijo Hills. The mountain lion was reported to be full size and was crossing the paved part of the trail. This location would match sighting last fall

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045
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San Elijo Hills Mountain Lion Sighting

O’Connell Landscape the contracted landscaping company for the San Elijo Hills Association has recently sighted a Mountain Lion near the Montage community of San Elijo Hills. This is a reminder that we share our surroundings with wildlife species.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

Here  are some historical clips about Mountain Lions in the San Elijo Hills, San Marcos and Elfin Forest areas

Mountain Lion sighting in Lake San Marcos

Our neighbors in Lake San Marcos have shared news that there has been a recent Mountain Lion sighting in their community. This is a reminder that we share our surroundings with various wildlife species and we need to consider this as we spend time in the open space areas and trails that surround our homes.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

Here  are some historical clips about Mountain Lions in the San Elijo Hills, San Marcos and Elfin Forest areas

Mountain Lion sighting in Elfin Forest

Neighbors in the Elfin Forest  area have alerted us that there has been a recent Mountain Lion sighting in their community.  A reminder of the December 2007 sighting at Cal State San Marcos of a lion that was thought to have been pushed west by October 2007 fires.
The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.
  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call the DFG at 916-445-0045

Mountain lion traps set up around Cal State San Marcos

Cal State sightings prompt precautions

By Sherry Saavedra UNION-TRIBUNE
December 27, 2007

SAN MARCOS – Traps have been placed around Cal State San Marcos following recent mountain lion sightings.

George Cagala, a university spokesman, said a maintenance crew spotted a mountain lion multiple times early this month, always late at night – by the library and toward the back of campus. The university contacted the California Department of Fish and Game on Dec. 10, Cagala said, and then agency officials spotted mountain lion tracks. Traps were set by a classroom building and in the back of one parking lot. “The good news is that the campus is pretty clear of people,” Cagala said. Students have been on winter break since Dec. 15, he said. However, Cal State San Marcos is surrounded by homes, a shopping center and a light industrial area. The traps were set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services unit, said Steve Martarano, a spokesman for the state wildlife agency.

No mountain lion has been caught. There have been no additional mountain lion sightings on the campus since mid-December, Cagala said. “They’re probably going to keep the traps up through Sunday and then remove them unless there are additional sightings,” Martarano said. There have been other sightings of mountain lions near college campuses, Martarano said. In November 2006, a mountain lion was captured at Humboldt State University in Northern California. It was tranquilized by a wildlife professor and released in a remote area. Mountain lions are a protected species in California, but can be trapped or killed when they present a public safety threat or have attacked pets or livestock, Martarano said. There have been 16 mountain lion attacks on people in California since 1890. Six were fatal.
READ THE ENTIRE UNION TRIBUNE STORY

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.
  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call the DFG at 916-445-0045

The Escondido Creek Conservancy to Connect “The Missing Lynx” for Wildlife Conservation

The Escondido Creek Conservancy has launched “The Missing Lynx” campaign to establish permanently protected wildlife corridors in North San Diego County. After successfully acquiring 975 acres as part of their “Save 1000 Acres” campaign, the Conservancy has shifted its focus to connecting the missing links, so wildlife can move freely between preserved areas, and protecting those linkages in perpetuity.

“Between climate change, pollution, and human expansion into wild areas, native plants, and wildlife around the world are struggling to survive,” says Executive Director, Ann Van Leer, “We want San Diego County to retain the natural beauty that has drawn humans here for centuries, but to do so, we must be dedicated to connecting the missing links between preserved lands.”

Connecting wildlands is crucial for wildlife, especially large mammals like mule deer (Odocoileus heminus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor), which typically have home ranges of more than 100 square miles. Successful wildlife corridors provide access to food and other resources, while also improving genetic variation. Connecting breeding populations of a species increases their ability to adapt to their changing environment, which is especially important as we begin to witness the effects of climate change.

“We manage preserves on either side of the I-15,” says Hannah Walchak, the Conservancy’s Land Conservation Manager, “It’s crazy to think that I can easily drive between these preserves, while the unique populations of mountain lions on each side are unlikely to meet because of a lack of connectivity.”

Since 1991, The Escondido Creek Conservancy has helped preserve over 7,000 acres in North San Diego County. Over the last three years, with the creation of the Mountain Meadow Preserve and the George Sardina, MD Preserve, the “Save 1000 Acres” campaign protected an additional 975 acres. While these are important cornerstone properties, “The Missing Lynx” campaign will prioritize land acquisitions in areas that are contiguous to other preserved lands in the Escondido Creek watershed.

The Escondido Creek Conservancy is seeking public support to protect and preserve these “missing lynx” to reduce conflicts with human activities, help North San Diego County retain its wild character, and give our native species a chance to live, and live wild. For more information about the campaign, see www.missinglynx.org.

Dry weather conditions sending more wild animals into residential areas of San Marcos

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Alert from The City of San Marcos-

Several bobcat sighting have been reported near Via Vera Cruz in San Marcos and the surrounding trail areas this month; California Department of Fish & Wildlife has been notified.

Dry weather conditions can send more wild animals into residential areas in search of food and water.While adorable, these wild cats and other wild animals should only be admired from a distance.

Wild animals, like bobcats and mountain lions, are most active around dawn, dusk and at night. Small children and pets should not be left outside unattended during those times and pet food should be brought inside. Runners, hikers and joggers should also avoid traveling alone when wild animals are most active.

Other safety tips include installing motion-sensitive perimeter lighting around homes and trimming brush to reduce possible hiding places. Additionally, providing food to deer is illegal in California because it could attract mountain lions.

For more information, safety tips or to report bobcat and mountain lion sightings visit the California Department of Fish and Wildlife www.dfg.ca.gov.

San Elijo Hills Community Association Updates – 1.15.15

San Elijo Hills

Following is a list of important announcements and upcoming events for San Elijo Hills Association:

Tropical Beach Party
The San Elijo Hills Community Association would like to cordially invite our San Elijo Hills Association residents 21 and over to our tropical beach party at Café Stoked! The event will be held on Thursday, February 26th from 6:00PM-8:30PM. Residents will be delighted with delicious hors d’oeuvres, drinks, music and dancing in the true spirit of a fun and festive beach party!

Attendance to this event is limited. Cost is $5.00/person. You must provide a check (no cash) payable to San Elijo Hills to Ted Tuleck in the Visitor’s Center in order to reserve your spot! All reservations will be taken on a first-come-first-serve basis. Please feel free to contact sehdirector@waltersmanagement.com with any questions.

Trail Use Regulations
With the onset of a new year, we would like to take the time to remind everyone of our trail rules here in San Elijo Hills as well as the La Costa Preserve which is adjacent to our trail system. Please keep these in mind while you are out enjoying the beauty of the community!
1. Stay on designated trails.
2. Trails hours are from dusk to dawn.
3. Bicyclists and skaters yield to equestrians; pedestrians yield to equestrians.
4. Keep to the right of the trail. Allow room for others to pass.
5. No smoking or fires allowed.
6. Motorized vehicles are prohibited.
7. Keep dogs on 6 foot leash maximum at all times; clean up after your pet.
8. Take out what you carry in; do not litter.
9. Rattlesnakes are found in this area. They will defend themselves if cornered or threatened. Ticks, poison oak, loose rock, steep ravines other dangers exist in parks and/or trails. Mountain lions have been spotted in this area. Please use caution.
10. If you have an emergency, dial 911.
11. Trail use is at your own risk.
Thank you!

San Elijo Hills Foundation
The San Elijo Hills Foundation is looking to fill a couple of Board positions opening up in 2015. The Board meets monthly, usually on the first Monday of the month at 5:30 right here in San Elijo Hills.

Please stop by the Visitor’s Center (open daily 10:00AM-5:00PM) if you are interested or e-mail the foundation at sehfoundation@gmail.com.

The San Elijo Hills Visitor’s Center is located across from the Town Square at:

1277 San Elijo Road
San Marcos, CA 92078

San Elijo Hills Community Association

San Elijo Life 2014 Year in Review

 

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San Elijo Life 2014 Year in Review

San Elijo Life was viewed about 160,000 times in 2014.

The busiest day of the year was May 15th during the Cocos Fire with 9,871 views. The most popular post that day was Timelapse photo of advancing fire from roof of Stone Brewery.

In 2014, there were 294 new posts, growing the total archive of San Elijo Life to 1,962 posts since 2006.

In 2014 we covered: Cocos Fire, Cell Towers, Double Peak School, Mountain Lion Sightings, HOA News and Events, New Questhaven Park Playground, Local San Elijo Hills Business, City of San Marcos News and Events.

Happy New Year from San Elijo Life

Upcoming Events for San Elijo Hills Association

Upcoming Events for San Elijo Hills Association

Board of Director’s Meeting: Thursday, February 6th

The first San Elijo Hills Community Association Board of Directors meeting for 2014 will be held on Thursday, February 6th at 6:00PM at the San Elijo Elementary School.

Trail Use Regulations

With the onset of a new year, we would like to take the time to remind everyone of our trail rules here in San Elijo Hills as well as the La Costa Preserve which is adjacent to our trail system. Please keep these in mind while you are out enjoying the beauty of the community!

  1. Stay on designated trails.
  2. Trails hours are from dusk to dawn.
  3. Bicyclists and skaters yield to equestrians; pedestrians yield to equestrians.
  4. Keep to the right of the trail. Allow room for others to pass.
  5. No smoking or fires allowed.
  6. Motorized vehicles are prohibited.
  7. Keep dogs on 6 foot leash maximum at all times; clean up after your pet.
  8. Take out what you carry in; do not litter.
  9. Rattlesnakes are found in this area. They will defend themselves if cornered or threatened. Ticks, poison oak, loose rock, steep ravines other dangers exist in parks and/or trails. Mountain lions have been spotted in this area. Please use caution.
  10. If you have an emergency, dial 911.
  11. Trail use is at your own risk.

NEW San Elijo Hills Visitor Center New Location

The San Elijo Hills Visitor Center has moved! Our new location is across from the Town Square at:

1277 San Elijo Rd.
San Marcos, Ca 92078

*Since 2006 www.SanElijoLife.com provides community news, photos, videos, and a directory of resources for residents of San Elijo Hills. The site is independent from the developer and the HOA and is run by local homeowners.

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