Tag Archives: CSUSM

Summer session at California State University San Marcos

The upcoming summer session at California State University San Marcos offers more than 170 accelerated courses that are open to CSUSM students as well as students from other universities and individuals in the community. Summer session dates are June 1 – Aug. 8, 2020.

Course topics feature such disciplines as mathematics, communications, computer science, women’s studies, human development, psychology, sociology, political science, and art, media and design. The classes are offered on a compressed timeline with students earning units in as little as five weeks. Face-to-face, online and hybrid formats meet a variety of needs.

During summer session, students from other universities, qualified high school seniors and community members can register for courses without being formally admitted to the university. Credits from CSUSM courses are fully transferable to other institutions. In addition, up to 24 undergraduate and nine graduate units taken as a nonmatriculated student may be counted toward a CSUSM degree.

By taking advantage of accelerated classes during summer session, students can get a head start on education goals, speed time to graduation or lighten the course load required in fall and spring terms.

The first block of classes will be held June 1 – July 2 and the second block of classes are scheduled for July 6 – Aug. 8. A small selection of classes run the full 10-week summer session, June 1 – Aug. 8.

Registration for CSUSM students opens on March 23 and for the public on March 30. For more information on summer session, please visit csusm.edu/summer.

As the academic outreach arm of Cal State San Marcos, Extended Learning is a leading provider of professional and continuing education in North San Diego and Southwest Riverside counties. Offering degree programs, professional certificates, and personal enrichment courses, Extended Learning helps individuals and organizations achieve their educational and training goals. Please visit CSUSM Extended Learning to learn more.

About California State University San Marcos

Building on an innovative 30-year history, California State University San Marcos is a forward- focused institution, dedicated to preparing future leaders, building great communities and solving critical issues. Located on a 306-acre hillside overlooking the city of San Marcos, CSUSM is the only public four-year comprehensive university serving North San Diego, Southwest Riverside and South Orange counties.

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City honored with CSUSM’s Community Partner of the Year Award

The City of San Marcos and North City have been selected as the recipients of the 2020 California State University San Marcos President’s Award for Community Partner of the Year.

The award was created to acknowledge CSUSM’s deep connections to the regional community and recognize partners who have engaged in meaningful projects and initiatives that support the university’s mission, according to CSUSM officials.

“The City of San Marcos has been by our side since CSUSM was founded more than 30 years ago,” California State University San Marcos President Ellen J. Neufeldt, Ed.D. said.

In a letter announcing the award, Neufeldt emphasized the many
ways that the City and the university work together, including the Democracy in Action program, which empowers students to engage with local government, along with the City’s collaborative approach to economic development, which has benefited the educational community along with the entire region.

“As the educational hub of North County, San Marcos is educating the next generation of leaders,” City Manager Jack Griffin said. “We are proud to partner with CSUSM to work toward this shared goal.”

The award also recognized the collaboration between the City of San Marcos and North City in creating a vibrant new downtown district that further connects CSUSM students, faculty and staff with the community.

“The City is supporting place-making at its finest in North City – a walkable community with restaurants and cafés as well as spaces to work and live – which enhances the quality of life our students and San Marcos residents alike,” Neufeldt said.

To learn more about the City of San Marcos, visit www.san-marcos.net/live. To learn more about the North City development, follow the progress and events on Instagram @northcitysanmarcos, or visit www.northcity.com.

CSUSM’S ENGIBEERING® PROGRAM LAUNCHES ADVISORY BOARD AND NEW SPRING COURSE

CSUSM’S ENGIBEERING® PROGRAM LAUNCHES ADVISORY BOARD AND NEW SPRING COURSE

As the EngiBeering® brewing science program at California State University San Marcos continues to grow, two notable developments have been unveiled for Spring 2020: an advisory board featuring four of the most respected brewers in the craft brewing industry has been established, and a new course focusing on large-scale/commercial brewing production will launch on March 18.

The four inaugural members of CSUSM’s EngiBeering Advisory Board are:

Tomme Arthur

Co-founder and Director of Brewery Operations, The Lost Abbey, Port Brewing Company

Marty Mendiola

Co-founder, Brewmaster and COO, Second Chance Beer Company

Jeremy Moynier

Senior Manager, Innovation Program and Supply Chain, Stone Brewing

Paul Sangster

Co-founder and Brewmaster, Rip Current Brewing Company

With more than a century of craft brewing experience between them, Arthur, Mendiola, Moynier and Sangster have worked at all levels of the industry, from bartender and homebrewer to brewmaster and brewery founder. Pioneers in the industry—and renowned nationally—they all hold prestigious medals and awards for excellence and innovation in craft brewing from national and international competitions, and they also serve as judges at esteemed brewing competitions such as the Great American Beer Festival.

In their advisory roles, these industry leaders will lend their considerable expertise to CSUSM’s innovative EngiBeering program as it expands to meet the needs of San Diego’s acclaimed craft brewing industry.

Additionally, the EngiBeering brewing science program announces ENGB 350: Process EngiBeering, the first course in a two-course sequence designed to familiarize students with large-scale/commercial brewing production. The course—which launches on March 18 and will be taught by Bill Sobieski, co-founder of Wild Barrel Brewing Company—will cover essential topics such as brewery design and layout, equipment acquisition and use, ingredients, creating and adjusting recipes, and more. Students interested in enrolling in this course should have prior knowledge of beer-making and the brewing process.

Spring enrollment is also open for ENGB 310: Sensory Evaluation of Beer, which will be taught by Paul Sangster, co-founder and brewmaster of Rip Current Brewing Company and a certified master judge through the worldwide Beer Judge Certification Program. This course begins on March 19.

For more information and to enroll, please visit CSUSM’s Extended Learning EngiBeering program page.

ABOUT CSUSM’S ENGIBEERING® PROGRAM

CSUSM’s innovative EngiBeering® certificate program explores the science, engineering and art behind brewing craft beer. The program—taught by faculty, industry experts and local brewery owners—features individual courses that examine the basics of brewing as well as two specialized certificates: Basic EngiBeering and Advanced Brewing Science. It is designed for current employees of breweries, individuals who aspire to work in the craft beer industry, homebrewers and craft enthusiasts who want to better understand production from recipe development to how to evaluate beer.

San Marcos supplying region with future-ready workforce

When you were a child, what did you want to be? Whatever it was, it’s probably still a viable career. But that’s not necessarily true for children today.

Robots could replace nearly a third of the nation’s workforce by 2030, according to research by McKinsey Global Institute. And the World Economic Forum predicts 65 percent of elementary students will end up in careers that don’t even exist yet.

As North County’s education hub, San Marcos plays a major role in supplying the region with a workforce that’s ready to adapt to these changing tides.

“San Marcos serves the most higher education students all of northern San Diego County, making this community a crucial talent pipeline” explained Economic Development Manager Tess Sangster. “And that workforce will be ready for the future thanks to our educational leaders.”

Case in point: The San Marcos Promise (TSMP), which provides scholarships and resources to students in the San Marcos Unified School District (SMUSD), is sharpening its focus on 21st-century work skills.

“Tomorrow’s workforce will need higher cognitive skills, such as creativity, critical thinking and collaboration,” explained Lisa Stout, TSMP Programs Coordinator. That jives with McKinsey research that predicts demand for those skills will grow 19 percent through 2030.

“The path to modern success won’t look the same for everyone, nor should it,” Stout added. “Many future professions won’t call for a traditional four-year degree.”

Palomar College tracks job trends, and as a result, has added future-focused programs in drone technology and cybersecurity.

“Advanced manufacturing is another big opportunity on the horizon, but these aren’t the factory jobs of the past,” said Nichol Roe, Palomar College’s Associate Dean of Workforce Development and Extended Studies. “They are highly technical, and involve 3D printing, automation and software solutions.”

“As technology advances, learning new skills on the job will be imperative,” added Jill Litschewski, Director of the Office of Internships and Service Learning at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM). “However, it will be equally important for students to also improvise solutions.”

CSUSM’s Senior Experience Program lets students do that by collaborating with business owners to tackle real-world projects. Often the work has a 21st-century focus. For example, some students recently helped test drone technology that could change how we fight wildfires.

“Programs like this underscore how much we need our businesses to be a part of workforce development,” Sangster said. “The City is committed to supporting these efforts because when we all invest in workforce development, it benefits our community’s overall economic health.

To learn more about the City’s economic development division, or about how you can help local students,  contact Tess Sangster at TSangster@san-marcos.net or (760) 744-1050, ext. 3120.

San Marcos goes back to school

As the summer winds down, San Marcos students are headed back to school. With elementary, middle and high schools back in school this week and Cal State San Marcos and Palomar College back in session later this month, I-15 and SR-78 travelers can expect increased traffic delays during their daily commute.

While the increase in traffic congestion is familiar to city residents, students and commuters alike, the City of San Marcos is pleased to report that continued relief is on the way.

In the city’s ongoing efforts to get motorists moving and improve traffic flow, several roadway improvement projects are lined up over the next five years.

Ongoing and Planned projects include traffic management system enhancements, upgrades to the city’s traffic signal communication network to high-speed Ethernet, traffic controller replacements, and citywide installation of LED safety lighting. Traffic signal improvements are also planned for Rancho Santa Fe Road and Grandon Avenue and intersection improvements at San Marcos Boulevard and Discovery Street.

Over the next five years, plans are also in place to reconstruct the State Route 78 overcrossing at Woodland Parkway, reconfiguration of on/off ramps, and the widening of Woodland Parkway, Barham Drive and Rancheros Drive. The City is working with Caltrans on completing the design of this project. Future funding and total project costs are still being determined based on ongoing discussions between the two agencies.

During the school year and periods of roadway construction, drive with caution and provide ample time to reach your destination safely and on time.

To learn more about planned traffic management improvements, visit www.san-marcos.net/trafficmanagement. Residents are encouraged to sign up to received city news, traffic alerts and information about programs and services by visiting, www.san-marcos.net/alerts and by following the City on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at the handle, @sanmarcoscity.

San Marcos firefighters help CSUSM students test drone technology

During a wildfire simulation, students explored how drones could deliver hoses to crews

Last month North County firefighters gathered in San Marcos for a wildfire simulation, but this wasn’t your typical training.
The City of San Marcos rallied crews from several cities to help California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) students test a drone technology that could improve how wildfires are fought.

“Firefighters spend a lot of time and energy shuttling hoses from the engine to the actual wildfire,” explained Nick Blaylock, one of the students involved. “And they’re often doing this up steep slopes and across rough terrain, which is exhausting.”

Drones, however, could possibly help crews conserve some energy by air-dropping those hose- packs so firefighters don’t have to haul them. As part of a senior project, Blaylock and four other students spent months exploring that with Skylift Global, a San Marcos-based company that makes drones capable of delivering supplies to first-responders.
Though Skylift Global has been in business for three years, serving firefighters is new territory it wanted to explore–so the company submitted a proposal for the Senior Experience Program, which assigns CSUSM students to real-world projects like these.
The students began by researching what crews face during a wildfire. That led them to San Marcos Fire Battalion Chief James Colston, who oversees the department’s training and safety division.“We’re fortunate to have Cal State San Marcos right here in our backyard, so we were happy to help,” he said. “We invited them to observe our annual training, which I think opened their eyes.”

It did, in fact, says Blaylock. His team realized that a drone probably couldn’t help much during the early stages of a wildfire because the flames are too unpredictable. But it likely could help during the later stages, when a fire border has been established.
Based on that, the students designed a simulation that included fire hose packs every 100-feet, as if a drone had peppered them out for crews. Now, all they needed were firefighters to run the test.

“Thankfully, Chief Colston got an amazing turnout for us,” Blaylock said. “We were so thankful that so many firefighters were willing to come volunteer their time on a Sunday morning to help us.”

During the May 6 simulation, firefighters from the cities of San Marcos, Carlsbad, Escondido and Rancho Santa Fe—as well as the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)—participated. Results showed that if crews did not have to manually haul hose packs, they worked about 18 percent faster—and theoretically, would be less fatigued during a real wildfire.

“While time is a good measurement, fatigue is really the key factor,” explained Colston, who added that he can see the potential support drones could provide. “If something like this can increase efficiency while reducing the chance of firefighters getting hurt, then I’m all for it.”
That exact sentiment is what inspired Amir Emadi to start Skylift Global. His father was working as a United States cooperative in Iraq when he was killed by Iraqi forces while protecting a city.

“Since then, I’ve spent my life finding a way to introduce technology to the people who dedicate their lives to protect us,” Emadi said. “I formed Skylift to help our first-responders save time, money and lives by delivering their critical supplies with our heavy-lift drones.”
As a next step, Emadi will use the research conducted by the CSUSM students to develop a plan to bring the drones to market. There are still hurdles to navigate, as drones are legally not allowed to be in the air during a wildfire, but Emadi is optimistic he can keep the momentum going.

“It was refreshing to work with such a driven, intelligent and responsible team,” he said, adding that although the CSUSM students have now graduated, some have remained interns and he hopes to hire them. “I am so thankful that San Marcos is home to such bright young talent like this, as well as city leaders who value innovation and are open to collaboration.”

For more information about Skylift Global, visit https://www.skyliftglobal.com/

City of San Marcos and CSUSM collaborate to benefit local active adults

Marcos, CA – The City of San Marcos is home to about 25,000 residents 50 years and older who are approaching retirement–or are in the thick of it. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re ready to slow down.

In fact, the San Marcos Senior Activity Center is buzzing with action. It serves about 7,000 senior residents per month, largely thanks to the dozens of volunteers who help run it. They do things like work the front desk, help in the computer lab and lead activities.

“Our volunteers bring a variety of talents that improve our services, and their support allows us to offer them at lower cost. That’s especially helpful to seniors on a fixed income,” said Parks and Recreation Manager Brenda Sylvia, who oversees the Senior Activity Center. “Volunteers are absolutely critical to our mission.”

A collaboration with California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) will help the City attract more of those critical volunteers.

The City and CSUSM recently joined forces to launch Democracy in Action, a program that lets university students tackle city issues. Unlike an internship, students are not given direction—but instead, make research-based recommendations, more like a consultant.

In this case, a group of about 30 students developed strategies to entice more volunteers to the City’s Senior Activity Center. This included designing marketing materials, creating a formal orientation process and finding missed opportunities to recruit volunteers. City staff is now fine- tuning the student-proposed strategies and plans to start rolling it out within the next few months.

“As North County’s education hub, San Marcos is fortunate to have plenty of bright young minds that offer a fresh perspective—something we greatly value here at the City,” Sylvia said. “Well-run cities with engaged residents lead to vibrant, thriving communities. If we want that to continue in San Marcos, we need to connect with our next generation of leaders and Democracy in Action is helping us do that. ”

This gets at the heart of Democracy in Action. The program’s bigger aim is to show students how their classroom knowledge applies to the outside world.

Dr. Eliza Bigham, CSUSM Department of Human Development, oversaw the students who worked on this project and she’s confident they left feeling empowered.

“Working with city staff and meeting with elected officials required my students to try something new and go outside their comfort zone. But I can’t tell you how many of them thanked me for the opportunity to grow through this experience,” she said. “They discovered that their skill set is so completely beneficial to address real, current needs in their own community.”

And Economic Development Manager Tess Sangster, who helps oversee the program, points out that this project benefits the community at-large.

“By boosting volunteer support at the Senior Activity Center, these students are helping residents age in place so that they can continue enjoying a high quality of life in San Marcos,” she said. “That’s a legacy we want to continue offering for generations to come, and projects like these are one of the many ways we’re making sure we can.”

To learn more about the Democracy in Action program, visithttps://www.csusm.edu/community/civiclearning/democracyinaction.html.

For more information about the San Marcos Senior Activity Center, including information about volunteer opportunities, visit http://www.san-marcos.net/adults50+.

San Marcos City Council Approves Massive Development Plan – NBC 7 San Diego

San Marcos City Council Approves Massive Development Plan Some residents are concerned it’s too much change while others are looking forward to new housing options

San Marcos is moving forward with a massive development project, but not without a little bit of pushback from the community. Tuesday, the City Council voted in favor to develop a desirable 87-acre parcel just west of Cal State San Marcos and east of the San Marcos Creek.

READ MORE VIA Source: San Marcos City Council Approves Massive Development Plan – NBC 7 San Diego

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