Tag Archives: dog

Exclusive Introductory Offer- Camp-Run-A-Mutt San Marcos

Camp-Run-A-Mutt is a cage free doggie daycare and boarding facility conveniently located off the 78 freeway in San Marcos. We have training and grooming available too!  We are offering an exclusive introductory offer of 20% off all daycare packages for new customers only.  Call or come by and visit.

Expires February 28th.

Please note:

We require current standings on Bordetella, Distemper/Parvo, Rabies, Leptospirosis, and Canine Influenza. All dogs over seven months must be spayed or neutered and are required to pass our standard temperament test.

Camp-Run-A-Mutt

910 Armorlite Drive, San Marcos 92069

760-471-2267

www.camprunamutt.com/sanmarcos

Heat tips from Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

With their cute round faces, big eyes, and fun personalities, short-snouted breeds such as French Bulldogs, English Bulldogs, Pugs and Boston Terriers have become increasingly popular in recent years.  These dogs, along with other flat faced breeds such as Boxers, Shih Tzus, Pekingese, and Japanese Chins are known as Brachycephalic dog breeds.  This term refers to the shape of these dogs’ muzzles, which are significantly more compact than other dog breeds.

While charming and adorable, flat-snouted dogs carry with them a special set of dangers vs their longer-nosed cousins.  Their flat faces mean significantly shortened facial bones and a shortening of the overlying soft tissue.  These structural differences mean both their soft palate (the soft tissue in the back of animals’ throats) and their nasal passage are more compacted, often resulting in a partially blocked airway. This particular set of structural abnormalities is known as Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome.  The end result is a relatively obstructed airway which affects the dog’s ability to respirate.

In addition to needing efficient breathing to provide oxygen to the body, dogs rely heavily on their respiratory tract to dissipate heat.  Breathing, in the form of panting, is the primary way in which dogs cool their bodies down.  This means that efficient breathing is essential for thermoregulation.  For Brachycephalic breeds, this vital function is restricted, often severely, which put these dogs in jeopardy during hot weather or extreme exercise. 

It is important that owners of Brachycephalic breeds understand the restrictions of their dogs’ anatomies.  For starters, these dogs should NOT be asked to participate in activities that require higher respiratory and cardiovascular output. This includes activities such as hiking, running, and jogging, especially during warmer weather.  While all dogs need exercise, flat nose breeds benefit from regular exercise that is slow and steady vs fast and/or intense. 

In addition, it is important to note that these breeds are especially susceptible to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.  The best way to deal with this problem is to prevent it and to know the signs of danger.

All dog owners should know the signs of heat-related injury and owners of Brachycephalic breeds should know these can occur much more quickly in their dogs vs. their longer snouted cousins:

Signs of Danger include:

  • A noticeable rise in breathing volume or a “gurgling” sound when they breathe
  • Excessive panting and/or panting that appears labored
  • Bright red gums
  • Excessive drooling
  • Glazed eyes
  • Difficulty walking/walking very slowly
  • Vomiting and/or bloody diarrhea
  • Lack of coordination or staggering
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are life threatening and should be considered a veterinary emergency.

The best way to “treat” heat related injuries are to simply prevent them.  The following advise will help prevent heat stroke in your dog:

  • Be aware of the forecasted temperature and keep your pet out of the heat; for some sun-loving dogs, this may mean locking them indoors during the heat of the day
  • Limit outdoor exposure during the hottest months of the year
  • ALWAYS have cool water available.
  • Walk dogs, especially brachycephalic breeds, on a harness.  This will prevent blockage of the airway which is essential for efficient respiration and efficient body cooling
  • Offer a cooling pad or cool areas for your pet to lie down if they need to cool off
  • DO NOT exercise your dog or allow them to play outdoors when it is warm outside.  Remember that flat-nosed breeds have a lower heat tolerance, so they should be exercised only when it is cool outside.

In addition, studies have shown that brachycephalic dogs who are physically fit are better able to respirate and are better able to manage their body temperatures.  This means that healthy weight and exercise are important to preventing heat related injuries.  Heed the following advise regarding conditioning your Brachycephalic dog:

  • In general, squatty flat-nosed dog breeds are not designed for strenuous exercise.  Avoid running/jogging, hiking, and similar exercise requiring significant respiratory output
  • Healthy weight is essential to the wellbeing of all dogs.  Your dog, regardless of breed, should have a visible waist and a “tummy tuck” behind their chest when viewing from the side.  In addition, your dog’s ribs should be easy to feel when lighting running your fingers down their sides.  You should not feel a layer of fat over your pet’s ribcage
  • Keep your pet physically fit.  While it is inadvisable to require strenuous exercise (such as jogging, running, and steep hiking) of a dog with a significantly flattened snout, exercise is still important.  Your pet should have mild to moderate exercise daily, ideally twice daily
  • If you are just starting an exercise program, do so slowly and allow your dog to buildup endurance over time
  • Always exercise your brachycephalic breed dog a harness.  This allows them to keep their already restricted airway as open as possible
  • When exercising (regardless of ambient temperature) always pay attention to your dog’s breathing.  If it becomes louder or seems strained or labored, stop the exercise and allow your dog to rest/cool down. Head home once they are cooled off
  • Take water with you during exercise with your dog.  This will allow you to help them cool down 

In general, it is important to remember that brachycephalic breeds often have significantly compromised respiratory tracts.  This affects their ability to exercise, handle extreme stress, and to cool their bodies.  Neglecting these considerations can put your dog in a life-threatening situation.

If you have any concerns about heat-related injury in your pet or any other concerns about your pet’s wellbeing, contact your veterinarian immediately for expert advise and treatment.

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Foxtails and Your Pets-Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo

This time of year, many dog owners are hitting trails to enjoy the beautiful weather with their canine friends.  Unfortunately, a fun day on the trail can turn into a painful experience for your pooch from a seemingly innocent source.

Foxtails are a frequent sight on trails, open spaces and yards in Southern California.  These invasive weeds are named for their clusters of spiked seed pods which resemble the tail of a fox.  Foxtails usually appear in our landscape in early spring.  Like the rest of San Diego county, they start out soft and green but by then end of the season they have dried to a brittle brown.

The dried, spiked clusters of the foxtail eventually break down into individual spikelets.  The pods are spiked and barbed, qualities that help them penetrate the tough San Diego ground.  Unfortunately, these qualities also allow them to wreak havoc on your pets.

Foxtails are a common emergency in veterinary medicine this time of year.  When a dog comes in contact with a foxtail, the barbs along the spikelet attach to the fur.  These barbs allow the foxail to move only one way: forward, while the sharp tip on the spikelet allows it to pierce skin or penetrate dense fur.

Foxtails will attach to almost any part of the dog that brushes against them.  Common sites of infestation are ears, eyes, nose, and between the toes.  They can also burrow beneath the skin along the body on thick coated dogs.  Occasionally veterinarians even see foxtails buried in tonsils or under the gums of dogs who enjoy chewing on these plants. 

Once embedded, these seeds rarely work their way out.  Their burrowing properties wreak havoc on infected pets and continue causing painful damage until they are removed. Veterinary intervention is usually required to treat foxtail infestation.  Sedation or surgery may be necessary, along with treatments to help with pain and infection resulting from “foreign body” invasion.

Signs of foxtails include:

A painful, infected ear

Head tilting or shaking

Acute, severe sneezing

Nasal discharge or bleeding

Squinting, painful eye

Red, painful bumps between toes or under the skin

There are some simple steps that owners can take to help their dog avoid a painful foxtail experience.  The simplest prevention is to avoid them altogether.  We find foxtails along trails, in open spaces, and in unlandscaped areas.  They are common in late spring through summer and can be identified by their bushy clusters of spikes resembling the tail of a fox. Foxtails can even be found in our yards, so carefully inspect unlandscaped areas for these invaders.
Even if you practice diligent avoidance, carefully check your pet after walks or hikes.  Common sites of infestation are between the toes, the legs, the underbelly, the eyes, and the nose.  With long coated dogs, it is a good practice to brush them out after hikes, as well.  Keeping your pet’s feet trimmed short can help prevent these dangerous hitchhikers; some owners even purchase hiking boots for their dogs to protect their feet on trail.

Dogs are not the only ones affected by foxtails.  Occasionally we see outdoor cats who have picked one up.  We most commonly see foxtails invade cats’ eyes, under their third eyelid.  Symptoms include painful swelling, redness, and discharge out of one eye.

Foxtails are not only painful but can be very damaging to your pet.  If you think your pet may be infected, contact your veterinarian immediately to prevent further pain and injury.

-Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

San Elijo Hills Community Association June 2020 Updates

Canyon Trail

If you have recently been on the canyon trail, you may have noticed new areas to explore! The Board of Directors arranged for Papayrus plants and Pampas grasses to be cut and cleared to expose the beautiful arroyo area along the trail.  Families are now able to enjoy the natural topography and experience new adventures! Make sure to check it out!

Community Tile Project Update!

Our community tile project is wrapping up! We now have over 1000 tiles returned, and they look absolutely amazing! The deadline to return your tile to A Colorful Universe is officially June 30th.

Please make sure to read the instructions! We are receiving tiles drawn with markers and paints other than what was provided. Many of these materials will burn off when the tile is fired and glazed. For instructions and information on ideas, tips & techniques visit https://www.acolorfuluniverse.com/the-tile-project. If you have any questions, please contact Liz McCardle at sehdirector@waltersmanagement.com.

2020 Census

The Census needs a certain number of applicants per Census tract to count in the areas where they live. The link where they can apply directly is: //www.2020census.gov/jobs. There is paid training, $21/hr. + $0.58/mi. flexible hours, management positions and other positions up to $23/hr. + mileage in some cases. If you have any questions, please contact Kirsten F, Recruiter/ 2020 Census Bureau: (858) 366-2074.

Support Your Local Businesses!

Don’t forget to order from the town square businesses! Their success is integral to the value of the community, and we need everyone to keep ordering out and helping in any way you can. Please visit sanelijohills.net with special messages and offers by our local businesses.

Dogs in the Hills

An increase in dogs off leashes has been reported in various neighborhoods, and especially on our beloved trails. While you may have a friendly pet, please consider the affects it may have on other trail users. A child or adult may be startled and ultimately injured from a dog running beyond their owner. Pet owners shall at no times allow pets to run unrestrained in common areas, streets, sidewalks or pathway areas and shall at all times have full and complete control over the animal. Please remember there is a $250 fine from the county (San Diego County Code Sec. 63.0102(b)(2)) for unrestrained pets.

Please pick up after your pets and remind your children to do so as well if they are responsible for the dog-walking duties. Don’t forget those common areas next to homes! Pet waste is probably the #1 complaint amongst our residents, so please be diligent and keep San Elijo Hills looking and smelling beautiful!

Water Conservation Project

Your HOA Board has been hard at work updating our irrigation system and landscape (to increase water conservation while enhancing the aesthetics of the community). This month they met virtually with three irrigation controller companies that can supply us with smart controllers to help with conservation and management. Our irrigation infrastructure is 15-20 years old and this capital improvement will provide substantial water and cost savings to the association. They hope to award the contract in the next couple weeks and get the work done before the summer heat. During the last couple weeks this project team has been focused on town center and getting all the missing trees replaced and the irrigation delivery systems updated as part of our conservation efforts. The next few weeks they will continue to focus on this area and the entrance to the community by updating the plant material which can be placed on drip systems, eliminating our overhead sprays and water waste.

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**Since 2006 SanElijoLife.com provides community news, photos, videos, and a directory of resources for residents of San Elijo Hills. The site is independent of the developer and the HOA and is run by local homeowners.

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 5 Year Anniversary Open House

Over the last five years, Advanced Veterinary Care has proudly served San Elijo, providing high quality, compassionate veterinary care to the pets of this wonderful community.  To commemorate our five-year anniversary, we are opening our doors to the community we gratefully serve. 

We would like to invite you to join us for our upcoming Open House. 

Join us in celebrating this milestone with music, food, refreshments, and great company. Tour the hospital, meet our doctors and staff, and have a great time while learning what sets Advanced Veterinary Care apart.

We look forward to seeing everyone there!

Keeping Your Pets Safe this Halloween Season 

Halloween Pet Dangers

Keeping Your Pets Safe this Halloween Season

Halloween can be a wonderful holiday for children and adults alike.  Many people love to enjoy this festive season with the entire family, including their pets.

To make sure your pet stays safe and enjoys this holiday, we offer the following advice:

Keep Those Halloween Treats Far Out of Pets’ Reach:  Halloween candies are the source of several dangers to our animal family members.  Most owners are aware that chocolate is toxic to their pets.  Chocolate contains caffeine as well as a toxin called Theobromine that in high enough doses can be very toxic to our animal companions.  Toxicity is based on the amount of cocoa ingested (dark chocolate contains more) vs. the weight of the pet.

“Healthier” Halloween treats may contain an artificial sweetener called xylitol which is extremely toxic to dogs.  Ingestion is a veterinary emergency and can even be fatal to our canine friends.

Overindulgence in candy (or other holiday treats), even those that don’t contain chocolate or xylitol can cause gastric upset or even a dangerous condition called pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).  These can be serious enough to warrant a trip to the veterinary clinic or even a hospital stay!

Finally, candy wrappers also pose a risk to indulgent pets.  Most pets don’t bother to unwrap the candy that they sneak off with.  Ingested wrappers can be very irritating to the intestinal tract and in some cases could even result in an intestinal blockage.  Note that even empty candy wrappers are attractive to our pets as they still smell like the treats they once contained.

Beware of Raisins and Grapes: While raisins make for a sweet, healthy alternative to Halloween candies, they can be very dangerous to our pets.  Grapes and raisins are poisonous to many dogs (and potentially cats).  Toxicity can be severe enough to cause kidney damage or even death in some cases.  Experts are still not sure how much grape material is required for toxicity or why some pets react more profoundly than others, so all grape/raisin ingestion is considered a veterinary emergency.

Watch Out for Halloween PlantsPumpkins, gourds, and corn are traditional Halloween foods and decorations.  While eating properly prepared pumpkins, squash and corn is relatively harmless for our pets, in some situations they can be dangerous.  Corn cobs are very attractive to dogs.  If ingested, cobs very may get stuck in the pet’s intestinal tract and require surgery to remove.  Similarly, decorative gourds/squash can be chewed up in large chunks that can get bound up in the intestines.  Finally, festive carved Jack o’ Lanterns often start to mold before they are thrown out.  If ingested these molds can make our pets ill.  Some molds called mycotoxins can even cause neurologic problems in dogs and cats.

Keep Glow Sticks Away from Pets: Glow sticks and glow jewelry are fun and can help keep us safe during Halloween activities.  While the glowing liquid inside is not toxic if chewed and ingested it can be very irritating to our pets’ mouths.  Ingestion can lead to oral irritation, drooling, pawing at the mouth, and even vomiting.  Additionally, ingested plastics can lead to gastric irritation or even intestinal blockage.

Be Careful with Halloween Decorations: Decorations are a traditional addition to Halloween festivities. They are fun for us but can be scary or even dangerous to our pets.  Pets can be intimidated by decorations, especially those with eyes, faces, or moving parts.  Be sure to introduce pets to decorations slowly using positive reinforcement. Many decorations also require electrical cords or batteries, both of which can be very dangerous if our pets chew on them!

Beware of Costumes:  As adorable as our pets are when dressed up, not all pets enjoy wearing costumes.  They can be irritating, scary, or even painful to our pets.  Some pets may panic when placed in a costume, which can lead to injury. Humans in costume can be very scary to our pets, too.  Make sure to introduce your pet slowly to costumed guests and read the pet’s body language.  Better yet, find a safe space for your pet to stay if people come over in costume.

Keep Candles Out of Pets’ Reach: Candles are common in Halloween decorations.  Remember that your pet does not recognize the danger that candles pose, and they may accidentally burn themselves or knock candles over.

Give Your Pet a Safe Space During Halloween Activities:  Trick or Treating and Halloween Parties are fun for us but can be very scary to our pets.  Make sure that your pets have safe space in the house away from trick or treaters at the front door, or party-goers in the house.  It is also advisable to keep your pets indoors during activities to prevent panicking pets from escaping from the yard.

Make Sure Your Pets Have ID Tags and Microchips:  Finally, make sure that your pet has an updated ID tag and (even better) a microchip with updated information.  In the event that your pet does escape during holiday festivities, this will make it easy for them to get back home if found.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns do not hesitate to contact us!  We are happy to answer any questions you may have! 760-736-3636  or www.sanelijovet.com

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Large Dog Park at San Elijo Hills Park Undergoing Renovations

The large dog park at San Elijo Hills Park, 1105 Elfin Forest Road, will be closed until approximately August 26 for turf repairs. The closure will allow the City to provide a better environment for pooches to play by installing new sod to repair a large portion of the park’s turf, which has deteriorated and exposed dirt and rocks. The new sod must be irrigated several times per day for approximately three weeks in order to establish roots and grow strong enough to handle foot (and paw) traffic.

We appreciate your patience during the repairs and hope that you will enjoy one of San Marcos’ additional dog parks, including Hollandia Park, Montiel Park, and Sunset Park.

View a map of all San Marcos dog parks.

April 2018 San Elijo Hills Community Association Updates (HOA)

San Elijo Hills Community Association Updates:

San Elijo Hills Women’s Club Women’s Fair

Make plans now to join friends, neighbors, and members of the surrounding communities on Saturday, April 28, for the 3rd Annual Women’s Fair, hosted by the San Elijo Hills Women’s Club. This free family event, which will be held from 10 am- 2 pm in the San Elijo Hills Town Center Park, has something for everyone—fitness and yoga classes; an on-trend fashion show; abundant opportunities for purchasing Mother’s Day, teacher appreciation, and other special gifts; active games, crafts, and face painting for the kids; and a convenient way to explore services and programs available within the community, including summer camps. For additional information, please visit www.sehwc.weebly.com.  If interested in participating in this year’s event as a vendor, please email SEHWCwomensfair@gmail.com.

Trails Clean-Up Day

The California Coastal Cleanup Day (CCD) is back! The San Elijo Hills trails system is a designated California Coastal Clean-up Day (CCD) area, and we need volunteers! The trail system within San Elijo Hills is such a beloved feature of our community! Please join us on Saturday, April 21st from 9:00AM-12:00PM to help clean up the trails! Volunteers will meet in the Town Square (by the fountain) of San Elijo Hills at 9:00AM. Walk-ups are welcome but pre-registration helps us with site logistics, so if you know for sure you want to help, please register online in advance. To register beginning April 1st, simply go to www.creektobay.organd then look for San Marcos – San Elijo Trails under the Cleanup Sites link. Special Instructions: All volunteers should wear comfortable closed toed shoes and sun protection. You can help reduce waste by bringing your own reusable water bottle, and gardening or work gloves. Note: every participant in CCD needs to sign a waiver; anyone under the age of 18 needs a parent or guardian signature to participate! Students are eligible for community service hours, and prizes will be given out for the most trash collected! Together we can all make a difference!

Country Fair

Yee-haw! Dust off your boots because the 2018 Country Fair hosted by San Elijo Elementary is back and better than ever before! The community of San Elijo has grown and so has the fair!! This year’s shindig will be held Friday, April 20th from 5pm – 8pm and Saturday, April 21st 11am – 5pm. Twice the fun! The Fair will be open Friday night from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and again on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Seek thrills on your favorite carnival rides like the Cliffhanger, Crazy Plane, Umbrella Cars, Cycle Jump, Alligator Alley and more. Plus enjoy food and live music on Friday night. Saturday will feature the new rides. Plus the same fun activities from the past including Pony Rides and Petting Zoo. The Country Fair committee needs new ranchers (Sponsors) and ranch hands (volunteers for the committee) to help make their biggest fundraiser of the year a good ole-fashioned success. If you would like more information on how to become a sponsor or volunteer; please contact seesptopresident@gmail.com.

San Elijo Hills Association Board of Directors Meeting

The next General Session Board of Directors meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 6:00 pm at the San Elijo Hills onsite office (1277 San Elijo Rd. S, San Marcos, CA 92078).

Dogs

Please pick up after your pets and remind your children to do so as well if they are responsible for the dog-walking duties. Pet waste is probably the #1 complaint amongst our residents so please be diligent and keep San Elijo Hills looking and smelling beautiful!

Open House Signs

The San Elijo Hills Community Association has a very specific sign policy in place regarding Open House signs in the community implemented to keep our community beautiful!  The San Elijo Hills Community Association’s governing documents prohibit the display of any non-Association signs in the Common Area. The intent of the San Elijo Hills Open House Sign Policy is to (1) provide an acceptable means for homeowners to market homes for sale within the community; (2) reduce the number of open house signs used in the community; and (3) discourage the ‘alternative’ means of signage that have been used in the past (sign spinners, signs on cars, etc.).  We are seeing an increasing number of unapproved signs, signs with balloons, flags, and riders that are directly in conflict with our policy. Here are some highlights:

*Approved Open House signage is allowed for use on Saturday’s and Sundays from 1:00 – 4:00 pm only. No riders, balloons, flags or other attention generating devises may be used with the sign.  Only one sign directing traffic either left or right may be installed at each corner. The first homeowner or agent to reach an intersection on route to their open house will place their sign at the given location. If another homeowner or agent has an open house along the same route, an additional sign is not needed. Homeowners or agents should continue to the next intersection on route to the open house and place their sign as necessary. In many cases, several open houses can be served by the same directional sign.

*It is your responsibility as the homeowner to notify your agent of the policy prior to putting out their signage. If it does not follow the guidelines, it will be removed and disposed of.

The Open House Policy can be found on our website www.sanelijohills.net for your convenience. Thank you for your anticipated cooperation.

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**Since 2006 SanElijoLife.com provides community news, photos, videos, and a directory of resources for residents of San Elijo Hills. The site is independent from the developer and the HOA and is run by local homeowners.

Summer brings warm temps and scaly critters

Summer brings warm temps and scaly critters 

As summertime brings warmer temperatures, more fury and scaly creatures have begun appearing in our yards and parks.

While April and May mark the start of rattlesnake season in San Diego County, recent reports have described increased snake sightings. As the reptiles come out of hibernation, it is not uncommon to spot them locally, though bites are rare. Most sightings are likely to happen between now and October.

“Snakes are most likely venturing out in search of food and to soak up the sun,” said San Marcos Park Ranger Ron Vinluan. “People think they’re going to chase you—that isn’t so. They don’t want anything to do with us.”

If you encounter one of the four varieties of rattlesnakes found in the county, give it space. Calmly back away from it, leave it alone and let it go on its way, Vinluan continued.

To avoid encounters with rattlesnakes, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife suggests these safety steps that can be taken to reduce the likelihood of startling a rattlesnake:

 

  • Never go barefoot or wear sandals when hiking. Wear sturdy hiking boots with loose-fitting long pants to protect feet and ankles.
  • Stay on paths and trails, avoiding tall grass, weeds and brush where snakes may hide.
  • Keep your dog on leash while hiking and be aware of what your dog is doing at all times.
  • Make sure you can see where you are reaching and that you can see ahead of you. Look for concealed snakes before picking up rocks, sticks or wood.
  • Be careful when stepping over doorsteps as snakes like to crawl along the edge of buildings where they are protected on one side.
  • Never hike alone. Always have someone with you who can assist in an emergency.
  • Teach children early to respect snakes and to leave them alone. Children are naturally curious and will pick up snakes.

If bitten or you feel a snake or other animal is dangerous, call 911 immediately. For more information about rattlesnakes in California, visit https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/News/Snake.

For more information about San Marcos parks, trails and outdoor adventures, visit www.san-marcos.net/play or contact San Marcos Community Services at (760) 744-9000.

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