Tag Archives: Mountain Biking

What to do when a snake bites you on a trail?


It’s snake season in San Elijo Hills -Here is some good advice for snake bites 

• No first aid is much better than performing bad first aid. Don’t cut at or around the site of the bite, don’t compress the bitten limb with a cord or tight bandage, don’t attempting to extract or neutralize venom using electricity, fire, permanganate, salt, black stones, mouths, mud, leaves, etc.

• All Snake Bite Kits are dangerous and should not be used. This was also confirmed by the Snake Bite Poison Line.

• A lot of snake bite patients injure themselves by panicking directly after a snake bite, by tripping over a rock or tree trunk, or by falling off the side of the trail. Staying calm is important! After a snake bite, walk about 20-30 feet away from the snake.

• Find a safe place to sit down asap. The venom can rapidly diffuse into your system, this can drop your blood pressure too low to pump all the way to your head while standing. Sitting down reduces your chance of fainting within the first few minutes. If you faint, it shouldn’t be more than a few minutes.

• Remove any rings, watches, tight clothing and anything else from the bitten limb, because the swelling will make it a lot bigger soon.

• Take 5 minutes to calm down and plan your evacuation. The only effective treatment for a snake envenomation is the right anti-venom to neutralize it.

• Do not wait for symptoms to appear if bitten. It’s important to get in touch with emergency personnel as soon as possible to get you to a hospital. If you have a cell phone and service, great, call 911 or the Park Ranger. If there is no service, think about the last time you had phone service.

• A sharpie can be a great help for emergency personnel to assess the severity of your snakebite. Circle the location of your snake bite and write down the time next to it. Draw a circle around the border of the swelling and write down the time. Write down all the things you’re experiencing that are not normal, with the time next to it. Examples are: metallic taste in your mouth, changes to sense of smell, sudden loss of vision, double vision, visual disturbances, ringing in the ears, headache, nausea and vomiting, bleeding from anywhere, dizziness, shortness of breath, etc. The most common signs and symptoms are pain and swelling.

• Update this info every 15 or 30 minutes as the swelling moves up the limb and your symptoms develop.

• Make contact via cell phone. If this is not possible, walk slowly to get help. Drink some water and take some calories if you have any. Some snake bite victims walk several miles after serious snake bites to their legs. They make it out fine because they made it out to medical care. This is much better than waiting for help if you can’t reach anyone. Don’t let the fear of “raising your heart rate and increasing the speed of venom circulation” prevent you from moving to get to care. Be very cautious about driving yourself to a hospital, since some bites have serious side effects that could suddenly limit your ability to drive.

Preventing a snake bite is obviously better than dealing with a snake bite. Here are a few ways to reduce the risks of snake bites while trail running:

• Be aware that there could be snakes where you’re running.

• Watch where you’re placing your feet, be extra aware on rocky, sunny areas, pockets of leaves and logs across the trail. If you’re off trail, the odds go up because there are more rocks and cracks and less people to scare the snakes away. Watch out when running through tall grass and weeds.

• Step on a rock or log, not over it. This way you can spot a snake that may be sheltering under it and take action quickly.

• Watch out when sitting down on a rock or tree stump, you might be sitting on a snake.

• Don’t try to chase the snake off the trail, this is why most people get bit by snakes.

• Don’t run with headphones on trails, or have at least 1 earbud out.

• Snakes tend to be near water, especially if it’s in a dry environment. If you’re near a spring or river, keep an extra eye out.

• Since snakes are cold-blooded, they’d like to come out when it’s warm and sun themselves on rocky areas or trails. They like to be on the edge of a sunny patch. If you come across a sunny patch, your encounter chances increase.

• Most venomous snakes in the US rest during the day. The chances of running into one are higher in the mornings and early evenings, when their activity might be a bit higher.

• In the spring, after snakes have hibernated together, the frequency of sightings goes up. In the fall, when they retreat to a hiding place to spend the cold winter months, they are on the go, so higher chances to encounter a snake. Most snake bites occur between April and October.

READ MORE VIA Source: What to do when a snake bites you on a remote trail? |

Rancho La Costa Preserve Trail Work Day

 

Dear Rancho La Costa Preserve Enthusiasts,

We have been riding, running and hiking La Costa Preserve all year. The poor lad is beat up and wore out. Now is the time to get him back on his feet so we can ride it hard another year. Help some maintenance done on Saturday January 22, 2011. Tools will be provided, some hamburgers to fill your belly when we are done and some swag to make it your lucky day. Possible work will be on turns, water drainage, revegetation of social trails and whatever else we can conjure up such as revegetation of the adjacent area around the Boy Scout Kiosk on the summit.

Remember gloves sunscreen and water. Children are definitely invited, what better way to show them respect for nature and community service. RSVP to rich@sdmba.com or rfj1@cox.net

Time: 8:00am
Date : Saturday January 22, 2011
Place: Camino Junipero and Corte Romero

Recent Mountain Lion Sightings Symphony/Montage vacant development in San Elijo Hills

The security guard for the Symphony/Montage vacant development in San Elijo Hills has reported a recent mountain lion sighting.  This location would match sighting last fall and this past spring.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045