Tag Archives: Pet

Pet Stress During the Pandemic

Stay at Home orders and the recent COVID pandemic have been a source of stress to many members of our community.  Our animal companions have provided comfort and relief from some of the stress we all are feeling; however, some pet owners are reporting concerning changes in their pets at this time. 
While it might seem that owners being home all day would be a dream for pets, we need to remember that their world has suddenly been turned upside down, resulting in significant stress.

Dogs, as a rule, tend to turn to their owners in times of stress and discomfort.  This is often expressed in things we consider “nuisance” behaviors.  Dogs may appear more needy by constantly following, nosing, and otherwise “pestering” their owners for attention.  In addition, dogs may act out by being more destructive, barking more, or even hiding in the house.  

Cats, on the other hand, often become anti-social during times of stress.  Feline family members may look for places to hide in the house and may disappear for hours at a time.  Additionally, cats may display destructive behaviors such as increased scratching and inappropriate urination behaviors.

While we can’t change the Stay at Home orders, we can do a lot to help our pets’ stress levels.  Patience, consistency, and creativity are key.

Be patient with your pets during this time and give them time to adjust to their “new normal.” Lashing out in frustration will only increase their stress.

Be consistent day to day.  Create a routine that your pet can depend on.  This does not mean that you can’t mix in fun surprises like hikes, walking adventures, and impromptu play sessions, but keep daily necessities like meal times and walks on a predictable routine.

Give your pets space: Make areas in the house where your pet can have “alone time,” and allow them to choose to be there.  Make sure these areas are safe, comfortable, and kid-free.

Create entertainment time: Make time to entertain your pet.  Exercise and mental stimulation are not only great stress relievers, but they increase the bond between owners and their pet.  There are many easy and inexpensive ways to exercise your pet’s body and mind.  Here are a few ideas:

Dogs:

Most dogs love physical exercise of one type or the other.  Ideas include playing ball in the backyard, simple neighborhood walks, or hikes on our beautiful local trails.  When exercising your dog, always take into account their level of conditioning and physical abilities.  Also consider current regulations regarding open trails, protective gear, and physical distancing.

Brain games can be as exhausting and stimulating as exercise for many dogs.  Try hiding toys and treats around the house for a game of “find it!” Mix up their meal time with maze/puzzle feeders, snuffle mats, and food stuffed Kong toys.  Finally, teach your dog some new tricks.  Pups both old and young love to learn!

Cats:

Cats benefit from physical and mental stimulation as well.  Keep some of those shipping boxes and make a “box fort” for your feline.  Few cats can resist the allure of a brand new box or bag!  Cats can also benefit from puzzle toys or maze feeders to make their meal time more interesting.  Look for puzzle feeders specially designed for cats (and make sure to keep the boxes for additional kitty play). You may also give your cat a new perspective by installing a new cat tree, wall shelves, hammocks, or window shelves for your cat to explore.

Finally, if your pet seems so distressed that it is manifesting physical symptoms.  Contact your veterinarian.  Psychological stress can be as hard on pets as it is on people, and there are medical options that can give your furry friend relief! 

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

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Keeping Your Pets Safe this Halloween Season 

Halloween Pet Dangers

Keeping Your Pets Safe this Halloween Season

Halloween can be a wonderful holiday for children and adults alike.  Many people love to enjoy this festive season with the entire family, including their pets.

To make sure your pet stays safe and enjoys this holiday, we offer the following advice:

Keep Those Halloween Treats Far Out of Pets’ Reach:  Halloween candies are the source of several dangers to our animal family members.  Most owners are aware that chocolate is toxic to their pets.  Chocolate contains caffeine as well as a toxin called Theobromine that in high enough doses can be very toxic to our animal companions.  Toxicity is based on the amount of cocoa ingested (dark chocolate contains more) vs. the weight of the pet.

“Healthier” Halloween treats may contain an artificial sweetener called xylitol which is extremely toxic to dogs.  Ingestion is a veterinary emergency and can even be fatal to our canine friends.

Overindulgence in candy (or other holiday treats), even those that don’t contain chocolate or xylitol can cause gastric upset or even a dangerous condition called pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).  These can be serious enough to warrant a trip to the veterinary clinic or even a hospital stay!

Finally, candy wrappers also pose a risk to indulgent pets.  Most pets don’t bother to unwrap the candy that they sneak off with.  Ingested wrappers can be very irritating to the intestinal tract and in some cases could even result in an intestinal blockage.  Note that even empty candy wrappers are attractive to our pets as they still smell like the treats they once contained.

Beware of Raisins and Grapes: While raisins make for a sweet, healthy alternative to Halloween candies, they can be very dangerous to our pets.  Grapes and raisins are poisonous to many dogs (and potentially cats).  Toxicity can be severe enough to cause kidney damage or even death in some cases.  Experts are still not sure how much grape material is required for toxicity or why some pets react more profoundly than others, so all grape/raisin ingestion is considered a veterinary emergency.

Watch Out for Halloween PlantsPumpkins, gourds, and corn are traditional Halloween foods and decorations.  While eating properly prepared pumpkins, squash and corn is relatively harmless for our pets, in some situations they can be dangerous.  Corn cobs are very attractive to dogs.  If ingested, cobs very may get stuck in the pet’s intestinal tract and require surgery to remove.  Similarly, decorative gourds/squash can be chewed up in large chunks that can get bound up in the intestines.  Finally, festive carved Jack o’ Lanterns often start to mold before they are thrown out.  If ingested these molds can make our pets ill.  Some molds called mycotoxins can even cause neurologic problems in dogs and cats.

Keep Glow Sticks Away from Pets: Glow sticks and glow jewelry are fun and can help keep us safe during Halloween activities.  While the glowing liquid inside is not toxic if chewed and ingested it can be very irritating to our pets’ mouths.  Ingestion can lead to oral irritation, drooling, pawing at the mouth, and even vomiting.  Additionally, ingested plastics can lead to gastric irritation or even intestinal blockage.

Be Careful with Halloween Decorations: Decorations are a traditional addition to Halloween festivities. They are fun for us but can be scary or even dangerous to our pets.  Pets can be intimidated by decorations, especially those with eyes, faces, or moving parts.  Be sure to introduce pets to decorations slowly using positive reinforcement. Many decorations also require electrical cords or batteries, both of which can be very dangerous if our pets chew on them!

Beware of Costumes:  As adorable as our pets are when dressed up, not all pets enjoy wearing costumes.  They can be irritating, scary, or even painful to our pets.  Some pets may panic when placed in a costume, which can lead to injury. Humans in costume can be very scary to our pets, too.  Make sure to introduce your pet slowly to costumed guests and read the pet’s body language.  Better yet, find a safe space for your pet to stay if people come over in costume.

Keep Candles Out of Pets’ Reach: Candles are common in Halloween decorations.  Remember that your pet does not recognize the danger that candles pose, and they may accidentally burn themselves or knock candles over.

Give Your Pet a Safe Space During Halloween Activities:  Trick or Treating and Halloween Parties are fun for us but can be very scary to our pets.  Make sure that your pets have safe space in the house away from trick or treaters at the front door, or party-goers in the house.  It is also advisable to keep your pets indoors during activities to prevent panicking pets from escaping from the yard.

Make Sure Your Pets Have ID Tags and Microchips:  Finally, make sure that your pet has an updated ID tag and (even better) a microchip with updated information.  In the event that your pet does escape during holiday festivities, this will make it easy for them to get back home if found.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns do not hesitate to contact us!  We are happy to answer any questions you may have! 760-736-3636  or www.sanelijovet.com

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo Winter Newsletter 2018

Winter Newsletter 2018

The doctors and staff at Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo would like to take this opportunity to wish all our clients and their families a happy and healthy holiday season.

Finding the Perfect Gift

Finding the perfect gift is the great obsession of every holiday shopper.  After scouring the malls and toy stores for something the recipient does not already have, the giver may think “A pet!” and picture their loved one embracing a fluffy puppy or kitten in the glow of the Christmas tree.  Such scenes are always heart-warming and there is no doubt that most people would love a puppy or kitten to cuddle near the fire on Christmas day.  But what about then next day?  What about when the kids go back to school and the puppy is left alone in a crate or backyard?

What of the kitten, who’s bow has come off and is having trouble using the litter box consistently?  What about the cost, for grooming, feeding, training, and veterinary care?  As pet lover’s, we at AVC understand the allure of a holiday pet and the joy it can to bring to a family for years to come.  With that in mind, here are a few things to consider before getting a pet as a gift.

  • Make sure the person wants the pet! Pets are a life-long commitment and can often interfere with jobs, school, vacations, and other lifestyle choices.
  • Consider getting the pet gear (bed, collar, leash, toys) and giving a “pet promise.”  After the holidays are over, take the recipient to a local shelter to pick out their pet.
  • Make sure the recipient has the financial resources to care for the pet.  Food, training, boarding, grooming, and veterinary care add up over time and you do not want to put someone in a position where they have a pet they cannot afford.
  • Shop the shelters first.  There are so many wonderful shelter dogs and cats available, and many shelters offer gift cards so you can give those as part of a “pet promise.”
  • Do research on whatever you are considering.  Do you have enough room for a large dog?  Is anyone in the family allergic to cats? Is your child old enough and responsible enough to care for a pet?  It is better to ask these questions before you get a pet than find out after you have bonded with a pet and have to rehome it.
  • Do not let getting a pet as a present be a “spur of the moment” decision.  A pet is a gift, not a present, and should be enjoyed throughout the year and not just at holidays.

If you have any questions about getting a pet this holiday, please feel free to contact AVC to speak to our knowledgeable staff.  If you get a pet, feel free to stop by so we can meet the newest member of your family!

Ringing in the New Year

It is natural for people to overindulge at this time of year and allow their pets to do the same.  Remember that pets have delicate digestive systems and changes to their diet could cause vomiting or diarrhea.  Turkey or ham scraps may seem like a nice treat for your dog, but you are better off throwing it away.  Turkey and prime rib bones are choking hazards and may cause internal bleeding.  Also, remember that alcohol is toxic to pets.  If possible, contain your pet in an area away from parties.  If your pet mingles with the guests, make sure they do not indulge in any untended plates or drinks.  If you have reason to believe your pet may have ingested something harmful, bring them to AVC immediately.

Possibly the most traumatic event for pets on New Year’s Eve is fireworks.  Fireworks can be so upsetting for some dogs that they jump through a window or over a six-foot fence out of sheer panic or in an attempt to escape the noise and booming vibration.  For this reason, the most important thing you can do to protect your pet (even indoor pets) is to make sure they are microchipped and have a collar with your contact information on it.  We strongly recommend your pet have both.  Other things you can do to help your pet survive the holiday include keeping them home, closing all the windows and doors, leaving a television or radio playing to drown out noise, keeping them in a small secure space, and staying home with your pet.  For dogs with an extreme fear of fireworks, all of the above, products like the Thundershirt, and even sedation may be required.

The doctors and staff at AVC are looking forward to an amazing 2019.  We wish all our friends, two-legged, four-legged, no-legged, and feathered, a safe and happy holiday season.

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Veterinary Workshop for High School Students!

Veterinary Workshop for High School Students!

We only have a few spots left! Register your student today!

Back by popular demand Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo is pleased to offer our next veterinary workshop on Wednesday, December 2nd! This class is open to High School students and will be held from 3:30 to 5:30. Students interested in a career in veterinary medicine are strongly encouraged to attend.

Veterinary Medicine 101

The Art of Physical Examination

vetnov

This course will cover:

  • How to perform a thorough physical examination on a dog
  • How to measure a dog’s vital signs

  • How to evaluate a dog’s body condition

  • How to use a stethoscope, otoscope and ophthalmoscope

Classes will be interactive lecture followed by a hands-on laboratory component. This class will be taught and directly supervised by a veterinarian. Gentle, friendly pets will be provided for students to learn physical examination skills. Enrollment is extremely limited and classes will be filled on a first come first served basis. Registration is 40.00 per student and is due in cash or check on the day of the workshop. Parents will be notified of your student’s registration status by e-mail. Refreshments will be provided.

Please visit our website at www.sanelijovet.com to fill out a registration form for your student. If you have questions or would like additional information please call our office at 760-736-3636.

Keep an eye out on our website for our information regarding our exciting upcoming “Exotics Encounter” workshop!

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo Hills

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo Pet Halloween Costume Contest

PET Halloween Costume Contest

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo is looking for the best pet Halloween Costume of 2015!

Does your cat make an amazing vampire? Can your bird rock a superhero cape? Is your terrier the perfect Halloween bat? Does your bearded dragon dress up for Halloween? We can’t wait to see it!

vethol

(Dr. Thomas’ cat Lefty, showing his Halloween Spirit!)

A winner will be chosen for each of three categories: best costume for cats, dogs and exotic species. Winning submissions will be featured on our website and Facebook page. Winning entries will receive a free examination, free nail trim and free box of delicious species-appropriate pet treats. Don’t let your pet down, they want the free treats! Start working on your submission today.

Entries can be submitted by e-mail at staff@sanelijovet.com, or you may stop by with your pet in costume, for an in-person photo opportunity. We are very excited to see your adorable pet entries. Please call our office at 760-736-3636 if you have any questions.

Please remember to keep your pet safe this Halloween!

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo Hills

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo is launching our Pet Awareness Workshop Series for children!

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo is launching our

Pet Awareness Workshop Series for children! 

We are very excited to host our first children’s veterinary workshop on Wednesday, June 10st!

The class is open to children in middle school and will be held from 2:45 to 4:30.

Veterinary Medicine 101

The Art of Physical Examination

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo is launching our  Pet Awareness Workshop Series for children!  

This course will cover:

  • How to perform a thorough physical examination on a dog
  • How to measure your dog’s vital signs

  • How to evaluate your dog’s body condition

  • How to use a stethoscope, otoscope and ophthalmoscope

Classes will be interactive lecture followed by a hands-on laboratory component. This class will be taught and directly supervised by a veterinarian. Gentle, friendly pets will be provided for children to learn physical examination skills. Enrollment is extremely limited and classes will be filled on a first come first served basis. Registration is $40.00 per child and is due on the day of the workshop. Parents will be notified of your child’s registration status by e-mail. Refreshments will be provided.

Please visit our website at www.sanelijovet.com to fill out a registration form for your child. If you have questions or would like additional information please call our office at 760-736-3636.

Advanced Veterinary Care’s Patient of the Month!

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo Hills

Meet Sadie, our Patient of the Month!

We are wrapping up our first few weeks of business in the community of San Elijo Hills and we have met many wonderful pets and their people. Although it has been a very tough choice, the doctors and staff at Advanced Veterinary Care have chosen Sadie, an adorable Bassett Hound mix, for our Patient of the Month.

Sadie was AVC’s first official patient, which makes her very special to our entire staff. She was brought in on an emergency basis, before we were even officially open, with a severe ear laceration. Sadie’s unique look and charming personality warmed our hearts immediately. Sadie was very brave and sweet, even when her poor ear was really hurting. We hope that Sadie stays out of trouble, but we look forward to seeing her in the future for years of preventative veterinary care.

Advanced Veterinary Care

For your convenience, our hospital is open SATURDAYS and SUNDAYS.

Saturday hours: 8 am to 2 pm, Sunday hours: 10 am-4 pm. Open Easter Sunday.

Routine, preventative, and emergency care provided.

50% off new client examination fee

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo
Open March 12th
1691 Melrose Drive #110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636

Community-Oriented Veterinary Care is Coming to San Elijo!

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo

Community-Oriented Veterinary Care is Coming to San Elijo!

Opening Thursday, March 12th 2015, Advanced Veterinary Care (AVC) of San Elijo will be operated by UC Davis graduates and experienced veterinarians, Dr. Sunshine Riehl and Dr. Paula Thomas, along with a seasoned professional support staff. The hospital will be equipped and staffed to provide comprehensive routine veterinary care and handle major emergencies including trauma, toxicities, and rattlesnake bites.

Advanced Veterinary Care will also host monthly children’s workshops to promote animal health, responsible pet ownership, and provide an opportunity for local youths to get a behind-the-scenes look at veterinary medicine. Classes incorporate a combined lecture/laboratory format and will be held for students in the 4th to 12th grades.

The hospital is located at 1691 Melrose Dr. Suite 110, in the Melrose Plaza shopping center, next to Mariah’s. Please visit our website at www.sanelijovet.com or call 760-736-3636 to schedule an appointment for your pet, join our client mailing list, or receive additional information regarding the AVC children’s workshops.

Families and their pets are encouraged to stop by and tour our facility, meet our doctors and staff, and pick up a treat for your family pet. We look forward to meeting you and serving the San Elijo community!

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