Tag Archives: San Elijo Hills

San Elijo Hills Home For Rent 5 Bedroom 4.5 Bathroom

1506 Sandbar Drive- For Rent 🏡5 Bedroom 4.5 Bathroom. Largest plan and pool in Promontory Ridge, San Elijo Hills Cul de sac-gated community with the new upgraded security system at gate. Mature landscaping. 2 fireplaces. Brand new 42’ Pool with 5 waterfalls, huge in-ground spa, and rock climbing wall in the pool. Brand new custom-built Bull BBQ, fridge, and kegerator. Guest room downstairs away from other rooms with french doors that lead to a huge spa and pool just steps away. Mature landscaping that creates an oasis-type feel in the background, very private. Newly installed beautiful pavers in the backyard. Powerful Pentair High-Performance pool equipment (heats up the spa in minutes) and pool within a day. 36 solar panels for the house makes your electricity bill nonexistent. 15 solar panels for pool- don’t need heat during summer at all. Nest system air conditioning throughout the home is easily controlled by an app. New custom-built wood and iron banister and gate on the front of the home. Huge master bedroom with office or sitting area and terrace overlooking the pool. Jack and Jill bedrooms and bath. Custom-built loft beds that turn two rooms into mini-apartments (they can be left or removed.)Top-of-the-line plantation shutters throughout the home. Recently painted interior and exterior with new paint. Recently upgraded shower and tiled master bathroom. Gorgeous new hardwood floors in living and dining rooms. Top of the line Bosch connects fridge and freezer. Second refrigerator in the garage. New Jenn air double convection oven New Jenn air range and hood New LG Double clothes washer and dryer with steam. Three-car garage with custom-built storage. Available 8/1 for lease 760-496-8134 (Call/Text)

Watch Video Tour

760-496-8134 (Call/Text)
www.hillsandcoast.com
E: ed@hillsandcoast.com
Edward Philbrick: REALTOR Lic #01967137
Corcoran Global Living Lic #02109201  

San Elijo Hills Real Estate Market Update for July 2021

The average home selling in San Elijo Hills is closing for 108% of the listing price in an average of just 11 days. The price per square foot in June was $480, up from $473 in May. Currently, only 11 active homes for sale in San Elijo Hills, and 28 homes are pending in escrow. With 28 homes selling in June. San Elijo Hills San Elijo Hills is highly sought after for its sense of community, schools, trails, and town center restaurants and shops. Low mortgage rates and historically low inventory of homes for sale make now the time to sell your San Elio Hills Home. Please call or text 760 496-8134, and we can talk about selling your home in this amazing market.

760-496-8134 (Call/Text)
www.hillsandcoast.com
E: ed@hillsandcoast.com
Edward Philbrick: REALTOR Lic #01967137
Corcoran Global Living Lic #02109201  

Mountain Lion Sighting in San Elijo Hills

Warning-Mountain Lion Sighting

UPDATE from The San Elijo Hills Community Association (HOA)

The HOA received an email from the Principal at San Elijo Elementary School that parents have reported seeing a Mountain Lion along the trail near the back gate. 

Please be aware of this situation if you have students who walk to and from school.  

This area is also a popular trail for hiking and biking, so please keep an eye out. The following is from the Mountain Lion Foundation on what to do if you have a close encounter with a mountain lion:

Seem as large as possible: Make yourself appear larger by picking up children, leashing pets in, and standing close to other people. Open your jacket. Raise your arms. Wave your raised arms slowly.
Make noise: Yell, shout, bang your walking stick or water bottle. Make any loud sound that cannot be confused by the lion as the sound of prey. Speak slowly and loudly to disrupt and discourage the lion’s hunting instincts.
Act defiant, not afraid: Maintain eye contact. Never run past or away from a mountain lion. Don’t bend over or crouch down. Aggressively wave your arms, throw stones or branches, do not turn away.
Slowly create distance: Assess the situation. Consider whether you may be between the lion and its kittens, prey or cache. Back away slowly to give the mountain lion a path to retreat, never turning your back. Give the lion the time and ability to get away.
Protect yourself: If attacked, fight back. Protect your neck and throat. People have used rocks, jackets, garden tools, tree branches, walking sticks, fanny packs and even bare hands to turn away mountain lions.
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**Since 2006 SanElijoLife.com provides community news, photos, videos, and a directory of resources for residents of San Elijo Hills. The site is independent of the developer and the HOA and is run by local homeowners.

Tips for a Calmer Feline Veterinary Visit

Experts recommend that all adult pets see a veterinarian once a year for a wellness visit.  These exams allow the veterinary team to screen for medical, husbandry, and behavioral concerns on a regular basis.  This gives owners tools to help their pet live as long and as happy a life as possible, while potentially identifying early signs of illness and disease allowing for early intervention.  Unfortunately, studies have shown that many cats are not getting these visits on a regular basis. This is not because cat owners do not love their feline family members, but because they are concerned about the emotional well-being of their pets.  

Many feline owners report that their cats feel an extreme level of stress when going to the vet, which may manifest as hiding, cowering, howling, and even aggression.  As a result, many cat owners avoid veterinary visits, sometimes until their pet is very sick.

There are, however, ways to make a cat’s veterinary visit a much lower-stress experience. Working in concert with your pet’s veterinarian and staff, techniques can be employed to lower your cat’s anxiety level before, during, and after the veterinary visit.  These calming techniques begin at home, days before your scheduled appointment.

Start with the Carrier:
The choice of carrier/crate is extremely important.  You may choose a hard or soft carrier depending on your and your cat’s preference, but whichever you choose, it should have a few traits:

  • It should be big enough for your cat to lie down in while still being light enough for you to carry from the bottom
  • The carrier should have at least two openings – one at the front and one on the top
  • It should be easy to take apart so that the cat doesn’t have to be dragged out of the carrier for the exam
  • It should be sturdy, secure, and quiet

Most cats flee at the sight of the carrier because they only see it when they are being taken to the vet.  This does not need to be the case.  You can train your cat to love its carrier!  First off, do not “hide” the carrier; this will only signal your cat to flee and become stressed when you remove the crate from its hiding place.  Leave the carrier out at all times and fill it with soft bedding.  Place it in an area that the cat likes to rest and leave the door open, encouraging your cat to use it as a sanctuary.  Many cats prefer elevated surfaces, so place the carrier on a secure table or shelf off of the floor.  Play with your cat near the carrier, so it becomes part of an enjoyable environment.  You may also place favorite toys, treats, or feline calming pheromone spray (“Feliway”) to encourage your cat to go into its carrier.  If your cat is reluctant at first, take the top off or the carrier leaving only the bottom tray and the soft bedding.  Once your cat starts to use the carrier for sleep, you can put the top back on and continue to encourage your cat to use the carrier as a safe space.

Calmer Transportation:

When it comes time to take your cat to the vet, give yourself time to make it a calmer experience.  Don’t rush to shove your cat into the carrier and go.  Take the time to lure your cat into the carrier with treats or toys.  Place familiar smelling objects in the crate before transport.

Once your cat is in the carrier, cover the carrier with a familiar smelling towel and/or one infused with calming pheromone spray.  When moving the crate, carry it from the bottom, at chest height, to prevent too much movement/swinging.  

In the car, place the carrier somewhere with lower visual stimuli and little motion.  The ideal place is on the floor behind the passenger seat.  Keep the towel over the carrier on three sides so the cat has the option to look out of the carrier or hunker in a darker space.  Play quiet, calming music while driving as cats may become stimulated by loud noises, and drive calmly trying to avoid sudden starts and stops.

At the Vet*:

Working with the veterinary team, you can make your cat’s time at the veterinary clinic a calmer experience.  Leave your cat in the safe space in the car for as long as possible.  This may mean calling the reception for check in or walking to the reception desk to check in while leaving your cat in the car, weather permitting.  Once in the hospital, keep your cat’s carrier on an elevated surface facing away from the open space of the waiting room where other animals may over-stimulate your pet.  

Once in the exam room, remain quiet and calm.  Open your cat’s carrier, but do not force them to exit.  Offer tasty treats and play with toys if your cat is interested.

*If your veterinarian is currently offering curbside service, leave your cat comfortably in their secure spot in the car until the veterinary staff member comes to get them for the exam.


The Return Home

Remember that your cat may still be in a heightened state of arousal when they come home.  This may interfere with their interactions with other pets in the household.  When you come home, take the carrier to a quiet, safe space and allow your pet to leave the carrier on its own. Watch for signs of stress or aggression between pets due to behavioral changes or foreign smells on your cat.  Distract other pets with treats or play while your cat acclimates to being back home.

Other Tips and Tricks

  • Bring your cat’s favorite high-value treats along to the veterinary visit.  Encourage staff members to feed your cat if your pet is willing to eat
  • Feed your cat less that morning so they arrive to the appointment hungry and willing to take treats
  • Purchase calming pheromone spray (“Feliway”) and spray covers, blankets, your car, and yourself 15 minutes before leaving for the vet

For very stressed cats, anti-anxiety medication can make veterinary trips a much calmer experience.  Appropriate use of these medications can help your pet immensely, resulting in less fearful visits which will ultimately benefit your pet’s health by decreasing stress and allowing for more comprehensive examinations.  Talk to your veterinarian about options for your specific pet.

If your cat has significant fear issues when going to the vet, discuss these concerns with your veterinarian so that their team can devise a plan to make the visit as low-stress as possible.  This will help your pet get the wellness care it needs to help it live as long and happy a life as possible.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our hospital at (760) 736-3636.

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

1st Annual Holiday Decorating Contest!

Join San Elijo Hills Community Association HOA in the holiday spirit for our 1st Annual Holiday Decorating Contest! 

$500 PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED FOR EACH OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES & A YARD SIGN TO LET EVERYONE KNOW YOU ARE A WINNER!
  • Best Overall
  • Most Original
  • Best inflatable display
  • Winter Wonderland
  • Best use of Homemade Decorations
  • Best Use of Space
  • Most Creative Use of Lights
  • Best Hannukah
  • Most Humorous
  • Rockin’ Holiday-Best Use of Music & Technology
  • Most Spectacular

Click here: https://sanelijohills.nabrnetwork.com/publicform.php?latest=1&qid=28306  to register!  Or Contact  sehdirector@waltersmanagement.com

All registrations must be received no later than Dec 13th 

Contest Rules

  • Registration is required to be eligible in the contest.
  • Contest is limited to what can be seen from the street side of the house at night.
  • People or live animals not allowed as part of the display.
  • Judging will take place the evening of December 16th from dusk until 9:00pm.
  • Please have your decorations turned on by 5:00pmas part of the display.
  • Judging will take place the evening of December 16th from dusk until 9:00pm.
  • Please have your decorations turned on by 5:00pm.
  • Winners will be notified on Friday, December 18th.

Judging Criteria

  • Creativity (originality, unique design & creative use of lights & decorations)
  • Arrangement (display & placement of decorations)
  • Special Effects (sound effects, fog, animation, etc.)
  • Overall Appearance (color coordination, balance, & overall attractiveness)

**Since 2006 SanElijoLife.com provides community news, photos, videos, and a directory of resources for residents of San Elijo Hills. The site is independent of the developer and the HOA and is run by local homeowners.

Shop small this holiday season to make a big impact in your community

Small businesses are the heart of a city’s character and vibe. That’s why this season’s Small Business Saturday, happening Nov. 28, is more important than ever.

It’s no surprise that small businesses have been hit particularly hard throughout the pandemic. San Marcos residents are encouraged to show their support by shopping local on Small Business Saturday and throughout the holiday season. Mayor Rebecca Jones announced the City of San Marcos’ participation in the 11th annual national effort to support the independent businesses that make our community unique and provide valuable contributions to the local economy.

“When you treat your loved ones to a special present or gift certificate from our local businesses, you’re truly investing in our community and helping our small businesses thrive,” Jones said. “That’s something we can all feel great about this holiday season.”

Created in 2010, Small Business Saturday serves as the ceremonial kickoff to the holiday shopping season for small businesses across the United States. An average of two-thirds of every dollar ($0.67) spent at a small business in the U.S. stays in the local community, according to the 2018 Small Business Economic Impact Study by American Express. That means consumer’s local impact during the important holiday shopping season could be significant.

“During this pandemic, I’m amazed and energized by the passion and creativity of business owners to continue to do business in the face of unparalleled adversity,” said Rick Rungaitis, CEO of the San Marcos Chamber of Commerce. “Now, more than ever, it’s critical for the community to support our local businesses. This holiday season, think of supporting them by shopping locally.” 

In 2019, 800+ mayors and city officials joined together to support Small Business Saturday. Highlights include:

  • U.S. shoppers who visited independent retailers and restaurants on Small Business Saturday reported spending a record high of an estimated $19.6 billion.
  • Seven in ten American adults reported being aware of the day.
  • 96 percent of respondents who shopped on Small Business Saturday agree that shopping at small, independently owned businesses supports their commitment to making purchases that have a positive social, economic, and environmental impact.
  • 97 percent of consumers who shopped on Small Business Saturday agree that small businesses are essential to their community.
  • 95 percent of consumers who shopped on Small Business Saturday reported the day makes them want to shop or eat at small, independently owned businesses all year long, not just during the holiday season.

Learn more about Small Business Saturday and the Shop Small initiative here.

Foxtails and Your Pets-Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo

This time of year, many dog owners are hitting trails to enjoy the beautiful weather with their canine friends.  Unfortunately, a fun day on the trail can turn into a painful experience for your pooch from a seemingly innocent source.

Foxtails are a frequent sight on trails, open spaces and yards in Southern California.  These invasive weeds are named for their clusters of spiked seed pods which resemble the tail of a fox.  Foxtails usually appear in our landscape in early spring.  Like the rest of San Diego county, they start out soft and green but by then end of the season they have dried to a brittle brown.

The dried, spiked clusters of the foxtail eventually break down into individual spikelets.  The pods are spiked and barbed, qualities that help them penetrate the tough San Diego ground.  Unfortunately, these qualities also allow them to wreak havoc on your pets.

Foxtails are a common emergency in veterinary medicine this time of year.  When a dog comes in contact with a foxtail, the barbs along the spikelet attach to the fur.  These barbs allow the foxail to move only one way: forward, while the sharp tip on the spikelet allows it to pierce skin or penetrate dense fur.

Foxtails will attach to almost any part of the dog that brushes against them.  Common sites of infestation are ears, eyes, nose, and between the toes.  They can also burrow beneath the skin along the body on thick coated dogs.  Occasionally veterinarians even see foxtails buried in tonsils or under the gums of dogs who enjoy chewing on these plants. 

Once embedded, these seeds rarely work their way out.  Their burrowing properties wreak havoc on infected pets and continue causing painful damage until they are removed. Veterinary intervention is usually required to treat foxtail infestation.  Sedation or surgery may be necessary, along with treatments to help with pain and infection resulting from “foreign body” invasion.

Signs of foxtails include:

A painful, infected ear

Head tilting or shaking

Acute, severe sneezing

Nasal discharge or bleeding

Squinting, painful eye

Red, painful bumps between toes or under the skin

There are some simple steps that owners can take to help their dog avoid a painful foxtail experience.  The simplest prevention is to avoid them altogether.  We find foxtails along trails, in open spaces, and in unlandscaped areas.  They are common in late spring through summer and can be identified by their bushy clusters of spikes resembling the tail of a fox. Foxtails can even be found in our yards, so carefully inspect unlandscaped areas for these invaders.
Even if you practice diligent avoidance, carefully check your pet after walks or hikes.  Common sites of infestation are between the toes, the legs, the underbelly, the eyes, and the nose.  With long coated dogs, it is a good practice to brush them out after hikes, as well.  Keeping your pet’s feet trimmed short can help prevent these dangerous hitchhikers; some owners even purchase hiking boots for their dogs to protect their feet on trail.

Dogs are not the only ones affected by foxtails.  Occasionally we see outdoor cats who have picked one up.  We most commonly see foxtails invade cats’ eyes, under their third eyelid.  Symptoms include painful swelling, redness, and discharge out of one eye.

Foxtails are not only painful but can be very damaging to your pet.  If you think your pet may be infected, contact your veterinarian immediately to prevent further pain and injury.

-Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo

Advanced Veterinary Care of San Elijo 

1691 Melrose Dr. Suite # 110
San Marcos, CA 92078
760-736-3636
www.sanelijovet.com

Smoke-free outdoor dining

As the death, disease, and financial devastation wrought by COVID-19 begins to recede in some communities, people who live in the San Elijo Hills community are wondering how best to protect their families as San Marcos moves to re-open restaurants and other businesses.

As a resident of San Elijo Hills, and as the Program Supervisor for Vista Community Clinic’s Tobacco Control Program, I have been learning a lot about the interaction between COVID-19 and tobacco and what it means for our families, friends, and neighbors. The combination of smoking/vaping and COVID-19 can be deadly – not just for those who use these products, but for people who may be exposed to secondhand or thirdhand smoke in their homes or in outdoor dining areas.

Residents are fortunate that almost every San Elijo Hills restaurant has voluntarily made its outdoor dining area smoke-free. Unfortunately, many restaurants in other parts of San Marcos still permit smoking outdoors, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. Check our online guide to find other San Marcos restaurants that offer healthy, smoke-free air: http://northcoastalpreventioncoalition.org/programs/tc/sfod/guide/. 

Smoke-free outdoor dining helps people smoke less and do less damage to their lungs’ ability to fight off infections. Doctors are warning those who smoke or vape that they are at risk of developing more severe COVID-19 symptoms. (See: https://tobaccofreeca.com/health/covid-19-stop-smoking-and-vaping/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwuJz3BRDTARIsAMg-HxUrfGS2-LwXhn_lcFCw4av7b_4F4MQfvKHwbcCaAHWu4t-8fMIO9JgaAvLJEALw_wcB)

The benefits of smoke-free air where we live, work, and play go beyond those who smoke or vape. It is possible that secondhand smoke exhaled by an infected person can spread COVID-19 to others. Secondhand smoke spreads quickly, is detectable more than 6 feet away, and remains airborne for a long time. The California Tobacco Control Program warns, “When people are smoking or vaping, they are also exhaling particulates from deep within their lungs into the environment around them.” (See: https://tobaccofreeca.com/health/covid-19-and-tobacco-what-you-need-to-know/)

Now, researchers at San Diego State University are warning us about thirdhand smoke and COVID-19,  saying that the coronavirus may be spread in indoor environments by “hitching a ride” on particles exhaled during smoking and vaping, and that the particles may linger for days on surfaces and in dust where thirdhand smoke and vapors accumulate. (See: https://thirdhandsmoke.org/dont-let-covid-19-hitch-a-ride/)

Last fall, well before COVID-19 captured our attention, Vista Community Clinic sponsored a series of community forums on secondhand smoke attended by more than 85 San Marcos residents. Many lived in apartments and expressed concern about secondhand smoke drifting into their units. “I am bothered by secondhand smoke in the apartment complex where I live. People are sometimes smoking around my kids, and my kids sometimes are curious to pick up cigarettes with their bare hands,” said Norma Vazquez. 

Other participants were concerned about exposure to secondhand smoke in outdoor dining areas. “This hits close to the heart for me because my mum passed away when I was 12 years old because of an asthma attack. I have asthma and my daughter tends to wheeze and has an inhaler,” said San Elijo Hills resident Sharmin Jesuthasan. “While we love sitting outdoors enjoying a meal at a restaurant, we typically don’t go if others are smoking in the outdoor dining area.”  

I encourage residents to thank restaurants in San Elijo Hills for their leadership in offering smoke-free outdoor dining to protect our health. For more ideas about what you can do to promote smoke-free air, contact Jennifer.Gill@vcc.org. 

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